Feb 08, 2023  
College Catalog 2021-2022 
    
College Catalog 2021-2022 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 

Portuguese

  
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    PORT 623 - Internship


    Category 3. Prerequisite(s): Four courses in Hispanic Studies numbered 204 or above and permission of instructor. Work with Internship Office. (3 Credits)

  
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    PORT 624 - Internship


    Category 3. Prerequisite(s): Four courses in Hispanic Studies numbered 204 or above and permission of instructor. Work with Internship Office. (4 Credits)

  
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    PORT 631 - Preceptorship


    Preceptorships give students the opportunity to observe and practice teaching skills. Available to highly accomplished students. Prerequisite(s): Some background reading and training in foreign language teaching and permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs. (1 Credits)

  
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    PORT 632 - Preceptorship


    Preceptorships give students the opportunity to observe and practice teaching skills. Available to highly accomplished students. Prerequisite(s): Some background reading and training in foreign language teaching and permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs. (2 Credits)

  
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    PORT 633 - Preceptorship


    Preceptorships give students the opportunity to observe and practice teaching skills. Available to highly accomplished students. Prerequisite(s): Some background reading and training in foreign language teaching and permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs. (3 Credits)

  
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    PORT 634 - Preceptorship


    Preceptorships give students the opportunity to observe and practice teaching skills. Available to highly accomplished students. Prerequisite(s): Some background reading and training in foreign language teaching and permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs. (4 Credits)


Psychology

  
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    PSYC 100 - Introduction to Psychology


    An introduction to psychological science – the study of behavior and mental processes. This course surveys the major subdisciplines of the field, including such topics as the brain and neuroscience, behavioral genetics, cognitive and social development, perception, learning, memory, decision-making, language, consciousness, emotions, motivation, psychological disorders, social identity, interpersonal interactions and group and cultural processes. Lecture and laboratory components. Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 172 - Psychology in the Material World

    Cross-Listed as ENVI 172  
    This course is an in-depth psychological analysis of consumerism and the human relationship to “stuff.” Consumerism, materialistic aspirations, and “affluenza” (the disease of affluence) all exert profound and often undesirable effects on both people’s individual lives and on society as a whole. These phenomena, and the consumerist culture they are embedded in, affect our psyches, our families, our local communities, the peoples of the world, and the integrity of our ecological system. This course draws from a range of theoretical, clinical, and methodological approaches to explore several key questions: Where does the drive to consume originate? Do we control our consumer behavior, or does it control us? Is it possible to live in our culture and not be a consumer? What are the alternatives to the status quo? We will analyze and discuss both the scholarly ramifications of these ideas and also how to act upon them in our lives and society more broadly. Offered occasionally (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 180 - Brain, Mind, and Behavior


    A multidisciplinary investigation of behavior and the nervous system. Particular emphasis is placed on human processes of perception, cognition, learning, memory, and language. This course also serves as the introductory course for the neuroscience major. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 182 - Drugs and Society


    Topics covered include: social and legal history of drug use and abuse in the United States and other countries, including ethnicity and chemical use, pharmacology of mood altering chemicals, chemical dependence and treatment, and drugs used in treating mental illness. Classes will consist of a mixture of lecture, film, discussion, role plays, etc. Prerequisite(s):  PSYC 100  or permission of instructor. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 194 - Topics Course


    Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 198 - Excursions Exploring Psychology


    This course exposes students to topics in psychology not covered in our standard curriculum through travel to a new geographic region. The course focuses on aspects of psychology unique to that region and also typically includes a study of the geography and culture of the region. It is designated as a January course. Participants meet prior to departure in order to learn necessary background information. The field excursion generally spans two weeks. The region and area of psychology to be studied may vary from year to year, and a student may take the course more than once for credit. This course is offered S/N grading only. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. Offered occasionally. (2 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 201 - Research in Psychology I


    This course is an introduction to the basic principles of research in psychology, with an emphasis on statistical techniques used in psychological science. We examine how to test psychological hypotheses using various statistical analyses, and we consider the pros and cons of experimental, quasi-experimental, and correlational research designs. The course includes a weekly laboratory component in which students develop proficiency with statistical software, writing reports in American Psychological Association style, and familiarity with experimental techniques unique to behavioral research. Prerequisite(s):  PSYC 100  Permission of instructor is required for first year students. Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 220 - Educational Psychology

    Cross-Listed as EDUC 220 
    An introduction to theory and research in educational psychology. Topics include learning theory, learner characteristics, intelligence, creativity, motivation, measurement and evaluation, and models of teaching appropriate for diverse learners from early childhood through young adulthood. Students are required to complete observations in classroom settings. Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 240 - Principles of Learning and Behavior


    This course provides an in-depth introduction to the principles and methods used in the study of how behavior changes as a function of experience. The emphasis will be on classical and operant conditioning principles and procedures, which have become the behavioral standard research technologies used in neuroscience, biomedical, psychopharmacological, and other animal laboratory research areas. The laboratory component is designed to give students experience with behavioral technology and data collection and analysis. Group A course. Prerequisite(s):  PSYC 100 , PSYC 180  and either STAT 155  or PSYC 201 . Every year. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 242 - Cognitive Psychology


    How do people learn, remember, and think?  How much of our cognitive life are we even consciously aware of?  This course addresses these questions and others from the perspective of experimental cognitive psychology.  Topics include perception, attention, memory, the organization of knowledge, language, and decision making. Weekly laboratory sessions afford students the opportunity to interact more directly with cognitive phenomena and research methods.  Readings are mainly from primary sources.  Group A course. Prerequisite(s):  PSYC 100 . Every year. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 243 - Psychological Anthropology

    Cross-Listed as  ANTH 243  
    This course explores the relationship between self, culture and society. We will examine and discuss critically the broad array of methods and theories anthropologists use to analyze personality, socialization, mental illnes and cognition in different societies. Our aim is to address questions related to the cultural patterning of personality, the self and emotions and to understand how culture might shape ideas of what a person is. We will also seek to understand how cultures define behavior as abnormal, pathological or insane, and how they make sense of trauma and suffering. Prerequisite(s): ANTH 101  or ANTH 111 . Alternate years. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 244 - Cognitive Neuroscience


    Cognitive neuroscience is a relatively recent discipline that combines cognitive science and cognitive psychology with biology and neuroscience to investigate how the brain enables the myriad of complex functions we know as the mind. This course will explore basic concepts and contemporary topics in the field, focusing in particular on the methods used in cognitive neuroscience research. Through lecture and lab sessions, students will learn to read and interpret primary source material, design and implement cognitive neuroscience studies, and present research in verbal and written forms. Overall, students will gain an appreciation for the amazing intricacy of the brain-mind relationship, as well as a sense of how this relationship may be understood eventually using cognitive neuroscience techniques. Group A course. Prerequisite(s):   or PSYC 100 . Every year. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 246 - Exploring Sensation and Perception


    An examination of the processes of sensation and perception. While the course features a strong emphasis on neurophysiology of sensation, classical approaches to the study of perception will also figure prominently. Lecture and weekly investigatory laboratory. Fulfills Group A requirement. Prerequisite(s):  PSYC 100  or PSYC 180  and permission of instructor. Every year. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 248 - Behavioral Neuroscience


    An examination of the role of the nervous system in the control of behavior. While the course features a systems approach to the investigation of sensory and perceptual mechanisms, molecular, cellular and cognitive components of the nervous system will also be discussed in the context of course topics. Particular emphasis is given to the nature of learning, memory, and motor processes, motivation, emotion, homeostasis, cognition, and human neurological function. The laboratory features a variety of instructor-demonstrative and student participatory research and laboratory activities. Fulfills Group A requirement. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100  and BIOL 200 ; or PSYC 180 . Every year. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 250 - Developmental Psychology


    Each of us is a unique individual with distinct interests, abilities, and appearances. At the same time, we all have much in common-each of us started as just a single cell at conception, our brains and bodies developed in essentially the same sequence, and someday, we will all die. What are the general paths and stages of development? How do our unique qualities emerge? What role does our genetic material play in development? What role does our environment play? Is there a point at which some of our traits are “set,” or do we retain the capacity to change throughout development? In this course, we will work to answer these questions and more. With a life-span approach, we will examine the theories and research that describe and explain our physical, cognitive, and social development from conception to death. Prerequisite(s):   or permission of instructor. Offered once each year. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 252 - Distress, Dysfunction, and Disorder: Perspectives on the DSM


    This course examines the experiences, causes, and treatments of the major forms of distress and disorder codified in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM), including schizophrenia, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, dissociative disorders, stress disorders, and personality disorders. We critically evaluate theories and research derived from biological, genetic, psychological, interpersonal, and social-cultural perspectives. Group B course. Prerequisite(s):  PSYC 100  or PSYC 180 Spring semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 254 - Social Psychology


    This course survey the ways in which social phenomena influence the thoughts, feelings, and behavior of individuals. We examine the major theories, experiments, and issues in the field of social psychology. Sample topics include emotion, aggression, conformity, attitudes, altruism, prejudice, persuasion, and group dynamics. Group B course. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 . Every year. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 258 - Industrial/Organizational Psychology


    Industrial-organizational (I/O) psychology is the scientific study of people in organizations - and the application of that science to workplace issues facing individuals, teams, organizations and society. This course will introduce you to the science and practice of I/O Psychology, and what I/O Psychology has to offer anyone who plans to lead others or to help develop effective organizations. Topics will include how to determine what to look for in candidates for hire, how to evaluate candidates for hire or promotion, how best to manage performance in organizations, what’s been shown to motivate people, employee retention, team effectiveness, and organizational culture. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100   Offered occasionally. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 264 - The Psychology of Gender

    Cross-Listed as  WGSS 264  
    This class is an introduction to feminist psychological theory and research dedicated to understanding and critiquing biological, psychological, social, and cultural meanings and implications of gender and its intersections with race, physical ability, sexual orientation, etc. Examples of research and theory will come from a wide variety of areas in psychology and related disciplines, and will address such issues as socialization and social development, stereotypes, bodies and body image, social relationships, identity, language, violence, sexuality and sexual behavior, well-being, work, etc. We will also learn about the historical, cultural, and epistemological underpinnings of psychological research on gender. Counts as a UP3 course. Prerequisite(s):  PSYC 100  or permission of the instructor. Every year. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 266 - History of Psychology


    This course explores major developments and ideas in psychology such as: the history of ideas about the mind; the effects of theorists’ life experiences on their ideas; key historical and social events that shaped the field; when and how psychology became a science; and how ideas about what is “normal” shape and are shaped by psychology. Counts as a UP3 course. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 . Offered occasionally. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 270 - Psychology of Sustainable Behavior

    Cross-Listed as  ENVI 270  
    This course is built around the argument that “environmental problems” do not exist; they are in fact human behavior problems. Thus, if we want to craft effective solutions to issues such as ocean acidification, air pollution, or climate change, we must start with the human behaviors that lead to them. We will cover psychological principles, theories, and methods and explore the complex web of factors underlying environmentally sustainable and unsustainable actions. A strong theme throughout the semester is the intersection of identity - personal, social, and cultural - and environmentalism.  We will explore questions such as, “Why do some groups of people feel a part of the sustainability movement while others feel alienated from it or skeptical of it?”; “Who takes action on behalf of the natural environment, under what circumstances, and why?”; and “How can we create contexts that promote true sustainability?” Psychology of Sustainable Behavior is a project-based class with a strong civic engagement component. Students will participate in three class projects: a self-change project (2.5 weeks), a community-based collaborative project (5 weeks), and a communication/education project (3 weeks). Prerequisite(s):   for Psychology majors. Offered yearly. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 272 - Health Psychology


    This course examines multiple, interactive factors that contribute to human health; we take a biopsychsocial approach to understanding how best to promote and maintain health, prevent and treat illness, and adapt and thrive in the context of chronic illness. We discuss the roles of stress, coping, immune response, social relationships, personality, and structural inequalities in the progression and prevention of disease. We also address some ways in which behaviors (e.g., physical activity, nutrition, substance use, sleep) can contribute to wellbeing or sickness, and we examine behavior change strategies that can help improve our own and our community’s health habits. Group B course. Prerequisite(s):  PSYC 100  . Offered every year (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 294 - Topics Course


    Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 301 - Research in Psychology II


    This course continues instruction begun in PSYC 201 . We more closely examine key factors for planning and implementing research studies, such as validity, variable operationalization, and common ethical dilemmas faced by psychologists. Students gain in-depth experience in developing, interpreting, and communicating different types of empirical psychological research designs (e.g., experiments, surveys). Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201  and must be a declared psychology major. Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 342 - Intelligence


    This course will explore what “intelligence” means, how it is measured, and how the answers to those questions depend on time, place, and culture. Specific topics will include the history of IQ testing, the biology of intelligence,  intellectual disability, and “brain training”. Special attention is given to cognitive approaches and measurement theory. Class sessions will mainly consist of student-led discussions of primary sources. Counts as a Section B course in the Cognitive Science concentration. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100  and PSYC 201 . Occasionally offered. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 350 - Race in Developing Lives


    For children to thrive in our increasingly diverse world, they must be prepared to engage with issues of race and racism. Children need to develop positive racial identities and learn how to navigate the racial privilege or discrimination that they will face in our society. Two of the best places for children to learn about race is from their parents and teachers, yet adults often struggle with this topic. Should we teach our children to be “colorblind,” or should we teach them to notice race? When is the right age to start these conversations? For families and schools that are committed to equity and justice, how can we ensure that these values are passed on to our kids? In this class, we will draw from developmental, educational, social psychological, and social justice perspectives to generate answers to these questions and more. Counts toward the UP3 requirement. 

      Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100  and PSYC 201 , and any other intermediate-level course. Every year. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 364 - Lives in Context: Psychology and Social Structure

    Cross-Listed as WGSS 364  
    In this seminar we will explore the relationship between individual lives and broad social systems in the United States. We will read theory, research, and case material from psychology and related disciplines about individual and interpersonal implications of social organization/social structure (in the domains of social class, gender, race, physical ability, sexuality, etc., and their intersections). We will pay particular attention to how and why it matters psychologically that U.S. society is organized hierarchically.  We will also address how to study the relation between individual lives and social structure. How can we really understand lives in their myriad contexts? What’s the best strategy for doing this? Is it even possible? What are some of the methodological, conceptual, and ethical dilemmas and challenges involved in such an undertaking? Because feminist psychologists have played a critical role in shaping methodology and research in these areas, we will read a considerable amount of work by feminist psychologists and other feminist academics. Counts toward the UP3 requirement. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 , PSYC 201 , and any other intermediate Psychology class. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 368 - Psychology of/and Disability


    What is “disability” and what does an understanding of disability tell us about human experience more generally? What is a “disability identity” and what implications might claiming that identity have for psychological well-being and social change? How do stereotypes of disabled people and expectations of “normality” affect everyone’s lives (not just those with disabilities)? Why don’t many Deaf people consider themselves “disabled?” What might we learn from shifting the “problem” of disability from the individual person to the social environment? This course will explore these and many other questions that emerge from thinking about the experience of disability (and its intersection with identities based on gender, race, class, and sexuality). Grounded in a critical disability and Deaf studies framework that considers the socially, culturally, linguistically, and historically constructed meaning of physical, sensory, and cognitive “impairments,” the course will rely on theoretical and empirical readings from psychology and related disciplines, memoir, film, and guest visitors as we explore the social and psychological meanings of disability. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100  and PSYC 201   Offered occasionally. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 370 - Understanding Race and Racism

    Cross-Listed as AMST 370  
    This course examines psychological factors associated with race and racism in the United States.  We will investigate theoretical, empirical, and experiential findings on the construction of race, racial socialization, and racial identity development. We will pay particular attention to the causes and consequences of racism at the individual, interpersonal, institutional and cultural levels of society, examining research on stereotyping, implicit/explicit bias, prejudice, and discrimination and how these factors contribute to racial disparities and inequality. We will also consider interventions for reducing racism, improving intergroup relations, and fostering greater equality and inclusion. Counts as a UP3 course. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 , PSYC 201  (or STAT 155 ), and at least one intermediate course in Psychology. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 374 - Clinical and Counseling Psychology


    This course examines specific applications of psychological principles to the mental health field by exploring strategies for therapeutic intervention. We discuss a wide range of approaches (e.g., psychoanalysis; humanistic therapy; cognitive behavioral and dialectical behavior therapy; mindfulness based stress reduction; family therapy; art therapy) and we consider issues raised by traditional clinical practice, such as ethics, the politics and economics of mental health, and cultural biases. NOTE: Students who have taken European Clinical Psychology through the DIS study away program must have instructor permission to enroll. Prerequisite(s):   and either   or PSYC 272  . Yearly. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 377 - Moral Psychology


    This course explores how and why we make moral judgments about people and their behavior. How are our moral judgments shaped by intuition, emotion, and reasoning? What are the moral implications of climate change? Do we ever put the interests of our broader group or community above our own self-interest? How do we balance punishment motives of retribution and deterrence, and how do these relate to policy decisions about capital punishment? Could a robot have moral rights and responsibilities? We will examine these questions by considering theories and findings from social, developmental, evolutionary, and political psychology, as well as from related fields like philosophy and artificial intelligence. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201  or permission of instructor. Every year. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 378 - Psychology of Language

    Cross-Listed as   
    An examination of psychological factors that affect the comprehension of oral and written language. Topics include the origin of language, how language can control thought, the role of mutual knowledge in comprehension, and principles that underlie coherence in discourse. Includes readings from psycholinguistics, philosophy, sociolinguistics, social psychology, and especially from cognitive psychology. Emphasis is placed on current research methods so that students can design an original study. Student led component. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 242  or PSYC 244 ; or two linguistics classes; or permission of the instructor. Every year. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 380 - Community Psychology and Public Health


    This course examines the inter-related fields of community psychology and public health psychology. These disciplines share a commitment to the promotion of well-being within a social and cultural context. Interweaving theory, research, and praxis, we interrogate concepts like risk and resilience, empowerment, social connection, and health promotion. We consider sociocultural and political factors that impact mental health, including housing access and eviction policies; health care access; stigma; and structural violence. Throughout the course, we focus on the unique contributions of psychological scholarship to understanding and improving population health. All students participate in a civic engagement experience of at least two hours a week to foster a fuller understanding of the course concepts. UP3 course.

     

     

        Prerequisite(s):

      and   (or  ) OR two CGH-related courses drawn from Categories A and/or B. Instructor permission required. Every year. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 382 - Hormones and Behavior


    This class will focus on the hormonal mechanisms of behavior in animals (including homo sapiens). Following introductory lectures, a series of topics will be explored, with a particular emphasis placed on those behaviors most directly mediated by hormonal activity (such as aggression, sexual and reproductive behaviors, stress responses, etc.). Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100  and PSYC 201  or STAT 155, and either PSYC 180 , PSYC 244  or PSYC 248   (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 385 - Mind Reading: Understanding Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging


    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a non-invasive technique used to provide indirect measures of neural activity in healthy (and unhealthy) humans. Although the technique has been readily available to researchers for only about 20 years, its popularity and use has grown tremendously in the last 10, and we now see it influencing aspects of culture and society not traditionally based in biomedical research (i.e., law, politics, economics). This course will cover the mechanics of fMRI, evaluate its strengths and weaknesses, and explore recent applications that have received wide and sometimes controversial media coverage. By the end of the course, students will understand essential components of the fMRI technique and be informed consumers of primary and secondary source reports involving brain imaging.  Prerequisite(s):   or STAT 155   and   or  . Offered occasionally. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 390 - Pain and Suffering


    This seminar-format course will examine both basic research and clinical aspects of pain and suffering. Following introductory lectures on suffering, pain and pain relief, a series of topics will be explored, including but not limited to: pain measurement in humans and animals; the ethics and use of experimental models in pain research; chronic pain; pain relief produced by drugs, acupuncture, hypnosis, and placebos; and learning processes that influence pain sensitivity. Features a student-led component. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 , PSYC 201  or STAT 155, and either PSYC 180  or PSYC 244 . Or permission of instructor. Every other year. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 394 - Topics Course


    Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 401 - Directed Research in Psych


    Directed Research provides an intensive research experience in which students engage fully in the research process and produce a complete study over the course of the semester. With the close support of a faculty member each step of the way, students design a research project intended to extend knowledge in a psychological area of their interest, collect and analyze data, write a research report that includes an extensive literature review, and present their project as a poster in a public setting. Directed research is open only to declared psychology majors; students are assigned to sections by the supervising faculty. This course fulfills the capstone requirement for the psychology major.  Prerequisite(s):  , at least one intermediate course, and at least one advanced course (or permission of instructor). Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 402 - Clinical Science Capstone


    Students in the Clinical Science Capstone will apply contemporary psychological science to their experiences working in social service settings. During the semester, students will spend a minimum of five hours a week in partnership with an organization serving people living with, or at high risk for living with, mental health challenges. During class time, we will explore the connections between science and practice, discussing evidence-based interventions, ethical dimensions of social service work, specific skill development related to students’ internship responsibilities, controversies about caregiving, stress and burnout among care providers, and other topics related to students’ specific community placements. Through varied activities (e.g., shared readings, discussion, reflective writing, and guest speakers), the course seeks to deepen students’ appreciation for applications of psychological science beyond the lab and classroom.
     
    As in Directed Research (PSYC 401 ), Clinical Science Capstone students will conduct a substantial research project. They will undertake a comprehensive review of past scholarship related to a key aspect of their internship experience, and they will prepare a capstone paper that uses past scholarship to ask and answer a vital question in the field. Unlike Directed Research, however, students in the Clinical Science Capstone will not be expected to gather data.   Prerequisite(s): PSYC 301  and an advanced psychology course Fall semester only. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 450 - Research in Hemisphere Asymmetries


    Although the right and left hemispheres of the brain are highly similar in terms of both structure and function, subtle and not-so-subtle differences between them exist. Exploration of these differences benefits our understanding of the mind and how it is implemented by the brain. Students in this course will identify a question about the right and left hemispheres, and design, conduct, analyze, write up, and present a research study investigating this question. The course fulfills the capstone requirement for the Neuroscience or the Psychology major. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 244 , the statistics requirement for the student’s major (STAT 155  for Neuroscience majors; PSYC 201  and PSYC 301  for Psychology majors) and permission of instructor. Occasionally offered. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 490 - Behavioral and Experimental Economics

    Cross-Listed as ECON 490  
    This course surveys recent developments in behavioral economics and considers applications in labor economics, macroeconomics, finance, public finance, consumer choice, and other areas.  Our goal is to draw on recent work in cognitive and evolutionary psychology to better understand human behavior and incorporate these insights into neoclassical reasoning and modeling. Counts as a Group E elective for the Economics major. Prerequisite(s): ECON 361  and ECON 371 . C- or higher required for all prerequisites. Offered every year. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 494 - Topics Course


    Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 601 - Tutorial


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (1 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 602 - Tutorial


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (2 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 603 - Tutorial


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (3 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 604 - Tutorial


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 611 - Independent Project


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (1 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 612 - Independent Project


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (2 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 613 - Independent Project


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (3 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 614 - Independent Project


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 621 - Internship


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. Work with Internship Office. Every semester. (1 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 622 - Internship


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. Work with Internship Office. Every semester. (2 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 623 - Internship


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. Work with Internship Office. Every semester. (3 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 624 - Internship


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. Work with Internship Office. Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 631 - Preceptorship


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs. Every semester. (1 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 632 - Preceptorship


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs. Every semester. (2 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 633 - Preceptorship


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs. Every semester. (3 Credits)

  
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    PSYC 634 - Preceptorship


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs. Every semester. (4 Credits)


Religious Studies

  
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    RELI 100 - Introduction to Islam: Formation and Expansion


    This course charts the formation of Islam and the expansion of Muslim peoples, from the life of the Prophet Muhammad to the Mongol conquest of Baghdad. It will examine Muslim institutions, beliefs, and ritual practices in their historical contexts. In addition to the basics of Muslim practice and belief, the class will introduce students to mystic traditions (Sufism), Islamicate statecraft, and intellectual/legal traditions as well as cultural trends including art, architecture, and literature. Every year. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 101 - Islam in America


    8 million Muslims in America make up only 3% of the population but represent worlds of culture reflecting the diversity of Muslim societies worldwide. The story of Muslims in America distinguishes, for historical and religious reasons, three groups: Blackamericans (42% of American Muslims), Indo-Pakistanis (29%), Arab/Middle Easterners (12%) from the rest of the American Muslim population. The historical and numerical importance of Blackamericans followed by Indo-Pakistanis (whose presence in America can be dated back to the split of the Subcontinent into India and Pakistan in 1946) interacts with the religious importance of Arab/Middle Eastern Muslims and becomes the basis of contentions about religious authority and the American Muslim identity. 9/11 presented unique challenges to American Muslims. These issues will be explored in this course. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 102 - Modern Islam


    Muslim-majority societies faced daunting social, political, and intellectual challenges after Europe-s military and economic expansion in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. In the modern period, Muslims have pursued various attempts at re-imagining Islam and strengthening Muslim-majority polities through different agendas of reform and revival. The course will survey the early-modern Muslim empires (Ottoman, Safavid, Mughal), the encounter of Muslim peoples with colonialism, and the major religious and social developments from the eighteenth century to the present. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 109 - Sufism: The Islamic Quest for Intimacy with the Beloved


    With attention to both classical texts and contemporary contexts, this course examines the formative development of Islamic mysticism, or Sufism, and its rich legacy of embodied piety and mystical intimacy. Drawing on the teachings of key Muslim mystics, we will explore the sacred sources, unitive doctrines, and metaphysical cosmology of Sufism, as well as its devotional practices, celebrated poetry, and contested ecstatic discourse. Every year. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 110 - The Big Questions


    What is religion? Why are people religious? What are the broad similarities and differences among various religions across culture and time? Some people describe themselves as spiritual but not religious. What does that mean? These are the basic questions that we consider in this introductory course. We shall explore religion as a practice of constructing similarities and differences that recruits virtually every issue that humans find important. Birth, puberty, and death; sex, money, and power; ethics and politics; humanity, divinity, and animality, earth and sky are all part of the religious imagination. We shall approach religion as a comparative practice, both intercultural and cross-cultural, through which people understand themselves and others. Every year. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 111 - Introduction to Buddhism

    Cross-Listed as ASIA 113  
    Buddhism is increasingly well-known in the USA, but what is it, and how does Buddhism encourage people to organize and think about their lives? Organized on the basis of the Eightfold Noble Path, with a focus of ‘morals, the Buddhist psychology of mind, and meditation,’  this course offers an introduction to the personalities, teachings, and institutions of Buddhism. Beginning in India at the time of the Buddha, this course focuses on Theravada Buddhism, asking students to think historically, philosophically, and anthropologically. Many Friday sessions will be dedicated to an exploration of the variety of Buddhist meditative techniques. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 112 - Buddhist Literature

    Cross-Listed as ASIA 112  
    Buddhist Literature introduces students to the forms, style, and usages of Buddhist literatures, as well as considerations of their content as well as their histories of creation, commentary, and social use. We will examine the structure of Buddhist canonical literatures but will also be focused on non-canonical literatures such as stories of past-life memories, biographies, and narrative visual and physical arts. Texts from multiple traditions of Buddhism, including Theravāda and Mahāyāna, will be included. This course’s primary activities will be reading, discussion, and reflective work. Alternate years. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 120 - The Jewish Bible


    In this course, we will study the Jewish Bible (also called the Tanakh or Old Testament) in its original cultural and literary contexts. Alongside an analysis of the biblical texts, students will also encounter related literature from the Ancient Near East to compare with the Bible. Through this comparative approach, we will gain insight into ancient history, as well as the political and theological views of the Israelites and their neighbors. We will also see how the Jewish Bible contributes to various topics of discourse that remain relevant today, including issues around ethnicity, feminism, LGBTQ concerns, God and science, ethics, and collective memory. As such, students will have the opportunity to put the Bible into dialogue with their own understandings of identity, society, and religiosity. Every year. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 121 - Jesus, Peter, Paul and Mary: The Beginnings of Christianity


    This course examines the diverse literature of the New Testament along with some other early Christian texts that did not become part of the Christian “canon.” We will employ historical-critical approaches in order to situate New Testament texts in their social, political, and historical contexts. We will pay special attention to how the various authors of the New Testament produced Jewish-Christian difference and how they understood the role of women within their communities. Contemporary modes of interpretation will be employed to explore the formation of identity in the first and second centuries of Christianity. Offered every other year. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 124 - Dharma and Dao: Big Ideas in India and China

    Cross-Listed as   
    An introduction to the study of Asian religious traditions in South and East Asia (India, China and Japan). Open to everyone but especially appropriate for first and second year students. Every year. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 126 - Religion in America


    The social and intellectual history of religion in the United States through the year 1900, with an emphasis on popular religious movements. The social and economic correlates of religious developments will be analyzed as well as the impact of Christian values on American institutions. Offered alternate years. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 127 - Religions of India

    Cross-Listed as  
    An introductory level course on the popular, classical and contemporary religious traditions of South Asia. Topics include Advaita Vedanta and yoga, popular devotionalism, monastic and lay life in Theravada Buddhism, the caste system, Gandhi and modern India. Prerequisite(s): RELI 124  or permission of instructor. Alternate years. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 130 - Folklore and Religion


    This course will introduce students to the study of folklore, belief and religious folklife. We will consider examples of folktales, myths, foodways, material arts, paranormal experience narratives, magic, healing and other traditions as they relate to religion. By examining folklore that emerges within, between, and in reaction to religious traditions, students will be challenged to move beyond simple notions of culture, religious authority, and doctrine. Participants in the course should be prepared for a heavy but exciting reading load. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 135 - India and Rome

    Cross-Listed as CLAS 135 
    This course is taught jointly between the department of Religious Studies and the department of Classics, by a specialist in the Roman East and a specialist in classical India. We will start on either side of this world, with Alexander the Great and Ashoka, exploring the relationship between empire and religion from Rome to India in the world’s crossroads for the thousand years between Alexander and the rise of Islam. Alternate years. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 136 - World Religions and World Religions Discourse


    Our goal will be to make an effort to comprehend just what cultural literacy would mean when studying the major religious traditions of the world, while at the same time developing an appreciation of some of the blind spots and problems in this enterprise. To a large extent, we will do some serious construction before we feel ready for de-construction. Every couple of weeks, we will cover one of five major areas (South Asia, East Asia, Judaism, Christianity, Islam) and each student will read a different author’s treatment of this material. Every year. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 145 - Pagans, Christians and Jews in Classical Antiquity: Cultures in Conflict

    Cross-Listed as CLAS 145 
    This course studies the interaction of Jewish, Christian, and pagan cultures, and the protracted struggle for self-definition and multi-cultural exchange this encounter provoked. The course draws attention to how the other and cultural and religious difference are construed, resisted, and apprehended. Readings include Acts, Philo, Revelation, I Clement, pagan charges against Christianity, Adversus Ioudaios writers, the Goyim in the Mishna, and apologetic literature. Alternate years. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 172 - Cambodia: Empire to Today

    Cross-Listed as ASIA 172  
    This survey course examines aspects of the histories and cultures of Cambodia. Emphasizing an interdisciplinary focus, we will examine aspects of geography, language, art, and religion, moving from the enormous and significant Angkor empire to contemporary Cambodia. Alternate years. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 194 - Topics Course


    Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing. Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 200 - The Qur’an and the Prophet


    This course introduces students to the Qur’an (Koran) through diverse perspectives, including through its revelation, assembly as a text, its interpreters, and the Qur’an as a material object. Students will learn about the life of the Prophet Muhammad in conjunction with the revelation of the Qur’an as well as the importance of the Prophet’s own sayings and example in Islamic law and practice. We will examine interpretations of the Qur’an from different chronological, geographical, and gendered perspectives. Students will leave the class with an understanding of the role of the Qur’an for Muslims and Islam historically and in contemporary times, as well as debates surrounding it. We will also examine contemporary expressions of Islamophobia, considering how misunderstandings of the Qur’an and its contents contribute to fears of the text and Islam. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 202 - Atheism Past and Present


    Over the last decade atheists have entered the public sphere in unprecedented fashion, authoring best-selling books and forcefully arguing their case in the international media. This seminar explores the origins, varieties, and arguments of atheist thought, past and present. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 212 - Philosophy of Religion

    Cross-Listed as  
    The Philosophy of Religion seeks an understanding of religion by raising philosophical questions about its underlying assumptions and implications. When we believe something it is because we think it is true and because we think we have good evidence to support our belief. In the case of religious beliefs, however, we are immediately faced with questions concerning the nature of such beliefs. What claims do they make? What would count as good evidence for a religious belief? What is the nature of religious truth? In this course we will examine the nature of religious beliefs and the ways in which philosophers in different traditions have justified or argued against such beliefs. Perhaps in response to the increasing challenge to religion from the natural sciences, twentieth century philosophers have questioned the traditional philosophical approach to religion. Some philosophers, Wittgenstein for example, question traditional interpretations of religious language and re-examine the relationship between faith and reason. Can religious life be practiced without a theology or with skepticism or agnosticism regarding theological questions? Other topics covered in the course include the attempt to introduce intelligent design into public schools as part of the science curriculum; religious pluralism; the belief in life after death; and feminist critiques of religious language. Alternate years. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 222 - Christianity in Late Antiquity


    This course introduces students to the emergence of a diverse social movement now termed “Christianity” within the political, economic, historical and cultural worlds of the ancient Mediterranean (i.e. the Roman Empire) We will examine the formation of early Christian identity during the first four centuries of the common era. We will explore multifaceted forms of religious practice, resistance to and adaptations of institutional and social power, relations between Christians and non-Christians, and rhetorical strategies used in articulating Christian identity. Offered every other year. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 223 - Orthodoxy and Heresy in Early Christianity


    The critical study of ancient Christian texts involves making strange texts familiar and familiar texts strange. In this course, we will consider non-canonical texts alongside canonical texts in order to develop insight into the formation of Christian identity in the first through fourth centuries. Special emphasis will be given to the development of the discourses of orthodoxy and heresy, the diversity of Christian beliefs and practices, and the examination of early Christian writings within their social and political contexts. Instead of investigating the material in strict chronological order, we will consider how different people (Jesus, Mary Magdalene, James, Paul, etc) serve as authorizing figures for the texts. Using this organization, we will investigate issues at stake in the development of Christian “canon,” including theology, Christology, apostolic authority, women’s roles, and the relation of Christianity to the state and to other religious traditions. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 225 - Women and the Bible

    Cross-Listed as WGSS 225  
    In this course we will examine the roles, identities, and representations of women in the Tanakh/ Old Testament, New Testament, and Jewish and Christian apocrypha.  We will explore how biblical writers used women “to think with,” and we will consider how gender is co-constructed alongside religious, social, and sexual identities.  We will ask the following sorts of questions: What opportunities for social advancement and leadership were open to women in ancient Israelite, early Jewish, and early Christian communities, and how did these opportunities differ from those open to women in other religious formations in the ancient Mediterranean?  How did biblical regulations of bodies, sexuality, marriage, and family life shape women’s lives? What are the social and material effects of biblical representations of women? And how might current feminist theories inform our interpretation of biblical texts about women? Alternate spring semesters. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 226 - Martyrdom Then and Now


    From Socrates to suicide bombers, martyrs have been forced to give up their lives, or chosen to risk them and even to die, rather than renounce their beliefs or practices. Of course, we know their stories only second hand. This course explores how narratives about martyrs (“martyrologies”) relate to the formation of religious identities and communities. Over the course of the semester, we will analyze martyrologies from the early Christian and Jewish periods, the beginnings of Islam, the sixteenth century, and modernity. We will pay special attention to the social and political contexts with which martyrs often found themselves at odds (including the Roman Empire in the ancient past, and the U.S./Middle East conflicts of the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries). In class discussions, readings, and written work, you will have the opportunity to reflect on the following questions (among others): How do the stories we tell about martyrs shape the way we understand religious practices and beliefs? How do narratives of bearing witness, suffering, and death help to illumine relationships between religious and political domains? How might our current understanding of martyrdom be informed for better and for worse by a study of history? (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 232 - Religion and Food


    Why does food play such a big part in so many sacred traditions? How do people use food to make sense of the world? Why do we fast, kill animals, feed spirits, and throw potluck suppers in the name of religion? This course will introduce students to the study of religion, using food as an entry point. Through readings, lectures, slides, videos, and hands-on experiences, we will investigate case studies from many cultures and historical periods. We will explore aspects of foodways such as cooking, farming, sacrifice, aesthetics, and display as they relate to myth, magic, ritual, healing, ethics and doctrine. Students will be expected to keep up with an intensive but interesting schedule of reading, to participate in class discussions and activities, and to complete written assignments including responses, several mini-projects, and a final library or field project on a topic of their choice. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 233 - Hindus and Muslims


    This class will be a reflection on the long history of co-existence of people in South Asia thought to belong to two very different religions Hinduism and Islam. We will begin by looking at the formation of classical Islam in the Middle East, and looking at the classical Hindu epic, the Ramayana. From there we will move to a survey of the history of encounter and exchange, from the early period (al Biruni), to the establishment of the great Muslim sultanates. We will critically examine the evidence of religious conflict, alongside the evidence of rich cultural exchange, and interrogate the competing historigrahic narratives, according to which South Asia either become a single Indo-Islamic civilization or a place of two cultures destined to become different modern nation states (India, Pakistan and Bangladesh). Finally, we will consider colonial and post colonial South Asia and conclude with a reflection on the Babri Masjid crisis and India’s debates about secularism. Offered alternate years. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 234 - Introduction to Jewish Life and Thought


    This course will survey Judaism’s basic beliefs and practices, from the Bible to the present day, through examination and discussion of religious and social literature created by the Jewish people. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 235 - Theorizing Religion


    The course is an introduction to some of the important theoretical and methodological work conducted by scholars in various disciplines who hope to better define and understand religious phenomena. This seminar begins with some of the early twentieth century texts that are often cited and discussed by contemporary scholars of religion (e.g., Durkheim, Weber, Freud) and then turns to a number of investigations stemming from engagement with earlier theorists or refracting new concerns. The course inquires into the problems of defining and analyzing religious cultures, and the researcher’s position or positions in this analysis, as this has been approached from anthropological, sociological, and religious studies perspectives. Offered every year. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 236 - Sanskrit and Classical Religion in India

    Cross-Listed as ASIA 236 , CLAS 202 , and LING 236  
    Like Latin and Greek in Europe, Sanskrit is a highly inflected language of scholarship and revered as the perfect medium for discourse on everything from science and sex to philosophy and religion. It flourished in its classical form after the age of the Buddha (5th century BC) and served as a scholarly lingua franca in India until the Islamic period. This course serves as an introduction to the grammar an script of Sanskrit, and we will advance to a point of reading simplified texts from the classical epic Ramayana.Students will be expected to attend class regularly and spend at least ten hours a week outside class studying the grammar and vocabulary. Without this sort of effort, no progress is possible in such a complex language. In addition to the rigorous study of the language, we will consider both the role of the language in classical Indian culture and religion, and some texts from the Ramayana, looking at both English translation and Sanskrit originals. Every other year. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 238 - Catholics: Culture, Identity, Politics


    A study of the religious tradition of Roman Catholicism. Some attention will be given to the theology and historical development of the Roman Catholic Church, but major emphasis will fall on the relationship of the Catholic religion to various Catholic cultures, including Ireland, Mexico, Poland and the United States. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 245 - Arabic Reading and Translation

    Cross-Listed as CLAS 345 
    This course aims to improve your Arabic reading and translation skills while introducing you to selected genres of Arabic and Islamic literature. The course will proceed in a workshop format and focus on the comprehension and translation of texts in question. Students will learn to use an Arabic dictionary, expand their vocabulary, deepen their understanding of grammar and syntax, and develop skills in reading manuscripts, navigating Arabic texts, and producing English translations. Prerequisite: Prerequisite(s): 3 previous semesters of Arabic language. Every fall. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 252 - Martin and Malcolm: Racial Terror and the Black Freedom Struggle


    This course situates Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X within the larger context of the black freedom struggle. While focusing on them as individuals, the bulk of the course addresses historical contexts, organizations, events, and individuals which are obscured by King’s and X’s celebrity. The black freedom struggle has always been national in scope with international implications. In addition to the “southern theater,” we explore of the black freedom struggle in the Western, Midwestern, and Northern regions of the country. We also explore the relation between historical expressions of the black freedom struggle such as the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 1960s and contemporary movements such as Black Lives Matter and Say Her Name. A major theme of the course is the role of religion and the larger category of spirituality as a kind of connective tissue among the various dimensions of the black freedom struggle. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 253 - James Baldwin and the Black Religious Imagination

    Cross-Listed as AMST 253  
    This course explores James Baldwin’s life and work as a writer and activist. Baldwin was a black queer man in an antiblack and heteronormative world. His queer imagination and spirituality are part of the same cloth. Deeply scared by the black church, Baldwin’s spirituality and art were, nevertheless, profoundly shaped by the spirit and language of black church religiosity. Through a heterogenous body of writing and the life he lived, Baldwin explored the souls of black folks (including queer blackness) and the nature of American identity. Fall semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 254 - Dealing with the Dead


    This broadly anthropological class introduces issues in the social study of death and the dead generally, focusing on the diverse ways in which different societies treat the dead as a social group, and the social powers that emerge from the practices of dealing with the dead. The class uses comparative examples to explore general themes, rooting these discussions in concrete cases. (4 Credits)

  
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    RELI 256 - Marxism, Anarchism, and Religion


    This course intends to introduce students to the foundational theories and concepts of the Marxist and Anarchist theoretical traditions, as they apply to the academic study of religion. I emphasize three words in the preceding sentence: foundational, theoretical, and religion, in order to clarify that this course will focus almost exclusively on older texts to the exclusion of more contemporary efforts in either tradition, that it will not focus on the practical revolutionary efforts of either Marxists or Anarchists, but rather on the theoretical writings of those traditions, and finally, that we will focus exclusively on those elements in the tradition that are most relevant to the study of religion. Every third year. (4 Credits)

 

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