Feb 01, 2023  
College Catalog 2021-2022 
    
College Catalog 2021-2022 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 

Linguistics

  
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    LING 300 - Linguistic Analysis


    The first prerequisite to understanding a linguistic message is the ability to decipher its code. This course is training in the decoding of grammar. Through practice in problem-solving, you will develop expertise in the grammatical systems of a wide sample of the world’s language types. Prerequisite(s): LING 100  - Introduction to Linguistics, plus one of LING 200  - Syntax or LING 205  - Phonology. Every fall. (4 Credits)

  
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    LING 304 - Experimental Phonetics


    What is sound and how do linguists study it?  This course is an introduction to basic acoustics and experimental procedures in linguistics.  We learn how to quantify the speech signal (using Praat software) to answer questions about human speech sounds. Students will have a chance to learn about their own speech through in-class activities, such as plotting their vowel space, measuring their pitch range, and determining how they produce consonants by conducting static palatography (a procedure where the tongue is “painted” to learn more about articulation). Students will conduct their own linguistic research based on a language/dialect of their choice. Prerequisite(s): LING 100  or LING 104  . Alternate fall semesters. (4 Credits)

  
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    LING 309 - Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics

    Cross-Listed as SPAN 309  
    A linguistic survey of the Spanish language aimed at improving pronunciation and increasing comprehension of the structure of the language, deepening students’ understanding of the sound system, word formation, grammar and meaning. Study will emphasize phonetics and provide an introduction to transcription, phonology, morphology and syntax, as well as provide an overview of linguistic change and geographic variation. This course satisfies the Area 3 requirement for the Hispanic and Latin American Studies major. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 305  or SPAN 306  or consent of instructor. Every year. (4 Credits)

  
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    LING 311 - Philosophy of Language

    Cross-Listed as  
    What is language and what is it for? What makes a series of sounds into a meaningful sentence? What makes a sentence true? Why is language always changing? This course will introduce students to ways in which twentieth century philosophers have attempted to provide answers to such questions. Since the philosophy of language has been so crucial to contemporary philosophy, this course also serves as an introduction to philosophical thought from the beginning of twentieth century to the present. Topics will range from more technical problems (theories of meaning, reference and truth; synonymy and analyticity; universals and natural kinds; private languages) to broader issues examining the relationship between language and culture (language games; radical interpretation; social change). Readings typically include writings by Ludwig Wittgenstein, W.V. Quine, John Searle, Donald Davidson, Richard Rorty, Michel Foucault, and bell hooks. Prerequisite(s): PHIL 201 , or permission of instructor (4 Credits)

  
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    LING 332 - Spanish in the United States

    Cross-Listed as SPAN 332  
    In this course, students will examine the different varieties of Spanish in the US and the effects of the linguistic contact between Spanish and English. Sociolinguistic aspects relevant to language contact will be addressed, as will related issues such as immigration patterns, bilingualism, Spanglish, and bilingual education. This course satisfies the Area 3 requirement for the Spanish major. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 305  and another 300-level Spanish course or consent of the instructor. SPAN 309  recommended. Generally taught alternate years. (4 Credits)

  
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    LING 335 - Analyzing Japanese Language

    Cross-Listed as ASIA 335  and   
    Our perception is greatly influenced by the language we use. Without knowing, we limit ourselves to thinking that our current perspective is the only way by which to view ourselves and the world. By analyzing Japanese, students can experience perceptual and cultural systems that are different from their own. At the same time, students may also discover that there are certain qualities that are common even in “exotic” languages such as Japanese. What is the function of the topic marker? Why can’t you translate “he is cold” into Japanese word for word? Why are there so many different personal pronouns in Japanese? How do you express your feelings in Japanese? What is the relationship between your identity and gendered speech? This course provides opportunities to discuss these questions that students of Japanese commonly have. Students will also experience examining authentic Japanese data. Japanese Language and Culture majors who are juniors and seniors may count this course as their capstone experience. Prerequisite(s): JAPA 204  or permission of instructor. Offered every three years. (4 Credits)

  
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    LING 378 - Psychology of Language

    Cross-Listed as   
    An examination of psychological factors that affect the comprehension of oral and written language. Topics include the origin of language, how language can control thought, the role of mutual knowledge in comprehension, and principles that underlie coherence in discourse. Includes readings from psycholinguistics, philosophy, sociolinguistics, social psychology, and especially from cognitive psychology. Emphasis is placed on current research methods so that students can design an original study.  Student led component. Prerequisite(s): PSYC 242  or PSYC 244 ; or two linguistics classes; or permission of the instructor. Spring semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    LING 394 - Topics Course


    Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing. (4 Credits)

  
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    LING 401 - Field Methods


    In this course, which is required for all linguistics majors, students meet with one or more bilingual speakers of a language unknown to them, and attempt by means of elicitation and analysis of texts to understand its structure.  This course is part two of the linguistics capstone.  Prerequisite(s): LING 300 . Spring semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    LING 435 - History of the Spanish Language

    Cross-Listed as SPAN 375  
    An overview of Modern Spanish as it has developed over time. Course will trace the historical evolution of the most salient phonological, morpho-syntactic and lexical traits of Modern Spanish and will include study of the origins of American Spanish. Students will also be introduced to some of the principal theories of language change. This course satisfies the Area 3 requirement for the Spanish major. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 309  or consent of the instructor. Offered occasionally. (4 Credits)

  
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    LING 436 - Spanish Dialectology

    Cross-Listed as SPAN 376  and LATI 376  
    A survey of modern dialectal variations of Spanish that includes examination of American Spanish dialects as well as those of the Iberian Peninsula. Sociolinguistic issues and historical aspects of dialect variation and study will be addressed, along with other extralinguistic factors. Through this course, students will be provided an introduction to theories of language change, as well as the history of the language, and will gain a broad understanding of the different varieties of Modern Spanish. This course satisfies the Area 3 requirement for the Spanish major. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 309   or consent of the instructor. Alternate years. (4 Credits)

  
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    LING 437 - Applied Linguistics: Spanish Second Language Acquisition

    Cross-Listed as SPAN 377  
    An overview of research projects on the acquisition of Spanish as a second language. Students will learn about the theoretical approaches used in these studies as well as the effects of various pedagogical approaches on the development of Spanish interlanguage systems. While the focus of the course is on the acquisition of Spanish as a second language, students will gain a broad and useful understanding of different pedagogical issues directly related to the acquisition/learning process(es) of other second languages. This course satisfies the Area 3 requirement for the Spanish major. Prerequisite(s): SPAN 309  or consent of the instructor. Alternate years. (4 Credits)

  
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    LING 488 - Translating Japanese: Theory and Practice

    Cross-Listed as   
    This workshop for advanced students of Japanese explores the craft and cultural implications of Japanese-to-English literary translation. It aims to give students not only a facility and sophistication in translating Japanese, but also a closer familiarity with the Japanese language itself. Through weekly translation assignments, we will examine the expressive qualities of the Japanese language, tracing major developments of prose style in the modern period and studying the socio-historical context manifested in those linguistic innovations. Our work will be informed and enhanced by engagements with theories of translation as well as essays on Japanese-to-English translation specifically. We will cover a broad range of genres, including essays, poetry, manga, and film (subtitles). The course will culminate in an original project translating a Japanese work of one’s choice. Prerequisite(s): JAPA 305 - Third Year Japanese I  or higher. (4 Credits)

  
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    LING 494 - Topics Course


    Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing. (4 Credits)

  
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    LING 611 - Independent Project


    Limit of one may be applied toward the major unless the student is carrying out a capstone or an honors project. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (1 Credits)

  
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    LING 612 - Independent Project


    Limit of one may be applied toward the major unless the student is carrying out a capstone or an honors project. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (2 Credits)

  
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    LING 613 - Independent Project


    Limit of one may be applied toward the major unless the student is carrying out a capstone or an honors project. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (3 Credits)

  
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    LING 614 - Independent Project


    Limit of one may be applied toward the major unless the student is carrying out a capstone or an honors project. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    LING 621 - Internship


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. Work with Internship Office. Every semester. (1 Credits)

  
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    LING 622 - Internship


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. Work with Internship Office. Every semester. (2 Credits)

  
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    LING 623 - Internship


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. Work with Internship Office. Every semester. (3 Credits)

  
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    LING 624 - Internship


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. Work with Internship Office. Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    LING 631 - Preceptorship


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs. Every semester. (1 Credits)

  
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    LING 632 - Preceptorship


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs. Every semester. (2 Credits)

  
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    LING 633 - Preceptorship


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs. Every semester. (3 Credits)

  
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    LING 634 - Preceptorship


    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs. Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    LING 641 - Honors Independent


    Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (1 Credits)

  
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    LING 642 - Honors Independent


    Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (2 Credits)

  
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    LING 643 - Honors Independent


    Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (3 Credits)

  
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    LING 644 - Honors Independent


    Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (4 Credits)


Mathematics

  
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    MATH 135 - Applied Multivariable Calculus I


    This course focuses on calculus useful for applied work in the natural and social sciences. There is a strong emphasis on developing scientific computing and mathematical modeling skills. The topics include functions as models of data, differential calculus of functions of one and several variables, integration, differential equations, and estimation techniques. Applications are drawn from varied areas, including biology, chemistry, economics, and physics. Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    MATH 137 - Applied Multivariable Calculus II


    This course focuses on calculus useful for both theoretical and applied work in the mathematical, natural, and social sciences. Topics include: partial derivatives, gradients, contour plots, constrained and unconstrained optimization, Taylor polynomials, interpretations of integrals via finite sums, the fundamental theorem of calculus, double integrals over a rectangle,and differential equations. Attention is given to both symbolic and numerical computing. Prerequisite(s): MATH 135 or a year of high school calculus at the level of AP calculus with an AB score of 4 or higher. 

      Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    MATH 194 - Topics Course


    Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing. (4 Credits)

  
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    MATH 212 - Philosophy of Mathematics

    Cross-Listed as  
    Why does 2 + 2 equal four? Can a diagram prove a mathematical truth? Is mathematics a social construction or do mathematical facts exist independently of our knowing them? Philosophy of mathematics considers these sorts of questions in an effort to understand the logical and philosophical foundations of mathematics. Topics include mathematical truth, mathematical reality, and mathematical justifications (knowledge). Typically we focus on the history of mathematics of the past 200 years, highlighting the way philosophical debates arise in mathematics itself and shape its future. Prerequisite(s): PHIL 111 , MATH 279 , or permission of the instructor. Alternate years. (4 Credits)

  
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    MATH 236 - Linear Algebra


    Linear algebra is one of the pillars of mathematics, both pure and applied. Linear relations can be used to model phenomena from numerous disciplines in the mathematical sciences, physical sciences, social sciences, engineering, and computer science. This introduction to linear algebra blends mathematical computation, theory, abstraction, and application. It starts with systems of linear equations and grows into the study of matrices, vector spaces, linear independence, dimension, linear transformations, orthogonality and projections, eigenvectors, and their applications. The resulting linear algebraic framework is a flexible and powerful way to approach multidimensional problems. Prerequisite(s):  MATH 279  or MATH 137 , or with permission of instructor, MATH 135  . Offered every semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    MATH 237 - Applied Multivariable Calculus III


    This course focuses on calculus useful for the mathematical and physical sciences. Topics include: scalar and vector-valued functions and derivatives; parameterization and integration over regions, curves, and surfaces; the divergence theorem; and Taylor series. Attention is given to both symbolic and numerical computing. Applications drawn from the natural sciences, probability, and other areas of mathematics. Prerequisite(s): MATH 137  or a strong high school calculus at the level of AP calculus with a BC score of 4 or higher. Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    MATH 279 - Discrete Mathematics


    Discrete mathematics studies collections of distinct, separate objects and is complementary to calculus (which studies continuous phenomena). This course introduces techniques for analyzing arrangements of objects and the relationships between them. The material emphasizes problem solving and logical argumentation, rather than computation. Topics include basic counting principles, induction, logic, recurrence relations, number theory, and graph theory. Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    MATH 294 - Topics Course


    Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing. (4 Credits)

  
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    MATH 312 - Differential Equations


    Introduction to the theory and application of differential equations. Solving linear and first-order systems using algebra, linear algebra, and complex numbers. Using computers to solve equations both symbolically and numerically and to visualize the solutions. Qualitative methods for nonlinear dynamical systems. Applications to diverse areas of modeling. Prerequisite(s):  MATH 236  and MATH 237 . Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    MATH 313 - Advanced Symbolic Logic

    Cross-Listed as   
    A second course in symbolic logic which extends the methods of logic. A main purpose of this course is to study logic itself-to prove things about the system of logic learned in the introductory course. This course is thus largely logic about logic. Topics include second order logic and basic set theory; soundness, consistency and completeness of first order logic; incompleteness of arithmetic; Turing computability; modal logic; and intuitionistic logic. Prerequisite(s):  PHIL 111  or MATH 279  or permission of instructor. Alternate years. (4 Credits)

  
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    MATH 354 - Probability

    Cross-Listed as STAT 354  
    An introduction to probability theory and application. Fundamental probability concepts include: sample spaces, combinatorics, conditional probability, independence, random variables, probability distributions, expectation, variance, moment-generating functions, and limit theorems. Special course topics vary and may include: computer simulation, stochastic processes, and statistical inference. Prerequisite(s):   MATH 237 ; or MATH 137  and MATH 236  . Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    MATH 361 - Theory of Computation

    Cross-Listed as   
    This course examines the theoretical foundations of computation. It explores different mathematical models that try to formalize our informal notion of an algorithm. Models include finite automata, regular expressions, grammars, and Turing machines. The course also discusses ideas about what can and cannot be computed. In addition, the course explores the basics of complexity theory, examining broad categories of problems and their algorithms, and their efficiency. The focus is on the question of P versus NP, and the NP-complete set. Prerequisite(s): (COMP 128  or COMP 221 ) and  , or permission of instructor. Alternate spring semesters. (4 Credits)

  
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    MATH 365 - Computational Linear Algebra

    Cross-Listed as  COMP 365  
    A mix of applied linear algebra and numerical analysis, this course covers a central point of contact between mathematics and computer science. Many of the computational techniques important in science, commerce, and statistics are based on concepts from linear algebra, such as subspaces, projections, and matrix decompositions. The course reviews these concepts, adopts them to large scales, and applies them in the core techniques of scientific computing. These include solving systems of linear and nonlinear equations, approximation and statistical function estimation, optimization, interpolation, eigenvalue and singular value decompositions, and compression. Applications throughout the natural sciences, social sciences, statistics, and computer science Prerequisite(s): COMP 120  or COMP 123 , and MATH 236   Every spring. (4 Credits)

  
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    MATH 376 - Algebraic Structures


    Introduction to algebraic structures, including groups, rings, fields, and vector spaces. Other topics may include geometric constructions, symmetry groups, algebraic coding theory, Burnside’s counting theorem, Galois theory. Prerequisite(s):  MATH 279  and MATH 236  . Every spring. (4 Credits)

  
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    MATH 377 - Real Analysis


    Basic theory for the real numbers and the notions of limit, continuity, differentiation, integration, convergence, uniform convergence, and infinite series. Additional topics may include metric and normed linear spaces, point set topology, analytic number theory, Fourier series. Prerequisite(s):  MATH 237 . Every fall. (4 Credits)

  
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    MATH 378 - Complex Analysis


    A course in the study of functions of complex numbers, a topic which touches fields as varied as number theory, applied mathematics, physics, engineering, algebraic geometry, and more. We cover: geometry and algebra of complex numbers; complex functions; differentiation and integration, including the Cauchy­Riemann equations, Cauchy’s theorem, and the Cauchy integral formula; Taylor series, Laurent series, and the Residue Theorem. Throughout, we emphasize complex functions as transformations of the plane, and also make a strong connection to applications. This course is appropriate both for students with an interest and background in theoretical mathematics and proof, and students whose primary interest is the application of mathematics to other fields. Prerequisite(s): MATH 236  and MATH 237 . Every spring. (4 Credits)

  
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    MATH 379 - Combinatorics


    A second course in discrete mathematics that develops more advanced counting techniques. Combinatorics is the study of arrangements, patterns and configurations. Generally speaking,  we fix a set of objects and then arrange those objects into patterns satisfying special rules. Once we identify an interesting family of objects, we ask: how many are there? what are their structural properties? how can we find the “best” one(s)?  Topics are drawn from  graph theory, enumerative combinatorics, graph algorithms, and generating functions.  Prerequisite(s): MATH 279  and MATH 237  . Offered odd-numbered fall semesters. (4 Credits)

  
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    MATH 394 - Topics Course


    Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing. (4 Credits)

  
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    MATH 432 - Mathematical Modeling


    Draws on the student’s general background in mathematics to construct models for problems arising from such diverse areas as the physical sciences, life sciences, political science, economics, and computing. Emphasis will be on the design, analysis, accuracy, and appropriateness of a model for a given problem. Case studies will be used extensively. Specific mathematical techniques will vary with the instructor and student interest. This course counts towards the capstone requirement. Prerequisite(s): MATH 312  and one of the following:  COMP 120  or COMP 123  or COMP 124 . Every fall semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    MATH 437 - Topics in Applied Mathematics


    Topics in applied mathematics chosen from: Fourier analysis; partial differential equations; wavelets; signal processing; time-frequency analysis; stochastic processes; optimization; computational geometry; and more. Topics are examined in theoretical and applied contexts, and from analytical and computational viewpoints. This course counts toward the capstone requirement. May be repeated for credit with departmental approval. Prerequisite(s): MATH 236  and one of the following: COMP 120  or COMP 123  or COMP 124 MATH 312  or MATH 365  recommended. Odd numbered spring semesters. (4 Credits)

  
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    MATH 455 - Mathematical Statistics

    Cross-Listed as STAT 455  
    An important course for students considering graduate work in statistics or biostatistics, this course explores the mathematics underlying modern statistical applications. Topics include: classical techniques for parameter estimation and evaluation of estimator properties, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, and linear regression. Special topics vary and may include: tests of independence, resampling techniques, introductory Bayesian concepts, and non­parametric methods. Though not the focus of this course, concepts will be highlighted through applications in a variety of settings. Prerequisite(s): MATH 354  . Even numbered spring semesters. (4 Credits)

  
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    MATH 471 - Topology


    A course in both theoretical and computational mathematics. Theoretical concepts include fundamental ideas from point set topology—continuity, convergence, and connectedness—as well as selected topics from algebraic topology—the fundamental group, elementary homotopy theory, and homology. This theoretical framework provides a backbone to understand new advances in topological data analysis. Applications are chosen from diverse fields such as biological aggregations, medicine, image processing, signal processing, and sensor networks. This course counts towards the capstone requirement. Prerequisite(s): MATH 365  or MATH 376  or MATH 377  or MATH 378   or MATH 379  . Odd spring semesters. (4 Credits)

  
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    MATH 476 - Representation Theory


    A course in matrix representations of groups, a topic which unites the powers of group theory and linear algebra. Topics include: symmetry in linear spaces, modules, group actions, characters, tensor products, and Fourier analysis on groups. Applications are chosen from: ranked data, molecular vibrations, quantum mechanics, random walks, number theory, and combinatorics. Important ideas from linear algebra are revisited from a more sophisticated point of view. These include: linear transformations, abstract vector spaces, change of basis, subspaces, direct sums, projections, and eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Prerequisite(s): MATH 376  . Odd numbered fall semesters. (4 Credits)

  
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    MATH 477 - Projects in Analysis


    Students will work on semester projects that build on the material of MATH 377  or MATH 378 . These projects are designed to serve as Capstone projects and will be open-­ended exploratory projects on topics chosen from real, complex, or functional analysis. Prerequisite(s):  MATH 236 , and either MATH 377  or MATH 378  (MATH 377  recommended).  Even numbered spring semesters. (4 Credits)

  
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    MATH 479 - Network Science

    Cross-Listed as   
    The modern Information Age has produced a wealth of data about the complex networks that tie us together. In response, the field of Network Science has arisen, bringing together mathematics, computer science, sociology, biology, economics and other fields. This course will explore the fundamental questions and the mathematical tools of Network Science. This includes: the structure of complex networks, including connectedness, centrality and “long tails”; community detection; random/strategic models for network formation; diffusion/contagion and “tipping points” on networks; and algorithms for analyzing complex networks. Prerequisite(s):  COMP 123 , MATH 236  and one of COMP 221 , MATH/STAT 354 , or MATH 379 .  Odd numbered spring semesters. (4 Credits)

  
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    MATH 494 - Topics Course


    Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing. (4 Credits)

  
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    MATH 601 - Tutorial


    Closely supervised individual (or very small group) study with a faculty member in which a student may explore, by way of readings, short writings, etc., an area of mathematics not available through the regular offerings. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (1 Credits)

  
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    MATH 602 - Tutorial


    Closely supervised individual (or very small group) study with a faculty member in which a student may explore, by way of readings, short writings, etc., an area of mathematics not available through the regular offerings. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (2 Credits)

  
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    MATH 603 - Tutorial


    Closely supervised individual (or very small group) study with a faculty member in which a student may explore, by way of readings, short writings, etc., an area of mathematics not available through the regular offerings. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (3 Credits)

  
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    MATH 604 - Tutorial


    Closely supervised individual (or very small group) study with a faculty member in which a student may explore, by way of readings, short writings, etc., an area of mathematics not available through the regular offerings. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    MATH 611 - Independent Project


    Individual project including library research, conferences with instructor, oral and written reports on independent work in mathematics. Subject matter may complement but not duplicate material covered in regular courses. Prerequisite(s): Arrangement with faculty prior to registration, departmental approval, and permission of instructor and department chair. (1 Credits)

  
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    MATH 612 - Independent Project


    Individual project including library research, conferences with instructor, oral and written reports on independent work in mathematics. Subject matter may complement but not duplicate material covered in regular courses. Prerequisite(s): Arrangement with faculty prior to registration, departmental approval, and permission of instructor and department chair. (2 Credits)

  
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    MATH 613 - Independent Project


    Individual project including library research, conferences with instructor, oral and written reports on independent work in mathematics. Subject matter may complement but not duplicate material covered in regular courses. Prerequisite(s): Arrangement with faculty prior to registration, departmental approval, and permission of instructor and department chair. (3 Credits)

  
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    MATH 614 - Independent Project


    Individual project including library research, conferences with instructor, oral and written reports on independent work in mathematics. Subject matter may complement but not duplicate material covered in regular courses. Prerequisite(s): Arrangement with faculty prior to registration, departmental approval, and permission of instructor and department chair. (4 Credits)

  
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    MATH 621 - Internship


    Internships are offered only as S/SD/N grading option. Prerequisite(s): Junior and Senior standing. Arrangements must be made prior to registration. Departmental approval and permission of instructor required. Work with Internship Office. Every semester. (1 Credits)

  
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    MATH 622 - Internship


    Internships are offered only as S/SD/N grading option. Prerequisite(s): Junior and Senior standing. Arrangements must be made prior to registration. Departmental approval and permission of instructor required. Work with Internship Office. Every semester. (2 Credits)

  
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    MATH 623 - Internship


    Internships are offered only as S/SD/N grading option. Prerequisite(s): Junior and Senior standing. Arrangements must be made prior to registration. Departmental approval and permission of instructor required. Work with Internship Office. Every semester. (3 Credits)

  
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    MATH 624 - Internship


    Internships are offered only as S/SD/N grading option. Prerequisite(s): Junior and Senior standing. Arrangements must be made prior to registration. Departmental approval and permission of instructor required. Work with Internship Office. Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    MATH 631 - Preceptorship


    Work in assisting faculty in the planning and teaching of a course. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor. Work with Academic Programs Office to complete a Preceptor Learning Contract Form . Every semester. (1 Credits)

  
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    MATH 632 - Preceptorship


    Work in assisting faculty in the planning and teaching of a course. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor. Work with Academic Programs Office to complete a Preceptor Learning Contract Form . Every semester. (2 Credits)

  
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    MATH 633 - Preceptorship


    Work in assisting faculty in the planning and teaching of a course. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor. Work with Academic Programs Office to complete a Preceptor Learning Contract Form . Every semester. (3 Credits)

  
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    MATH 634 - Preceptorship


    Work in assisting faculty in the planning and teaching of a course. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor. Work with Academic Programs Office to complete a Preceptor Learning Contract Form . Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    MATH 641 - Honors Independent


    Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (1 Credits)

  
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    MATH 642 - Honors Independent


    Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (2 Credits)

  
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    MATH 643 - Honors Independent


    Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (3 Credits)

  
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    MATH 644 - Honors Independent


    Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    STAT 112 - Introduction to Data Science

    Cross-Listed as COMP 112  
    This course provides an introduction to the handling, analysis, and interpretation of the big datasets now routinely being collected in science, commerce, and government. Students achieve facility with a sophisticated, technical computing environment. The course aligns with techniques being used in several courses in the natural and social sciences, statistics, and mathematics. The course is intended to be accessible to all students, regardless of background. Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    STAT 125 - Epidemiology


    Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of disease and health in human populations and the application of this understanding to the solution of public health problems. Topics include measurement of disease and health, the outbreak and spread of disease, reasoning about cause and effect, analysis of risk, detection and classification, and the evaluation of trade-offs. The course is designed to fulfill and extend the professional community’s consensus definition of undergraduate epidemiology. In addition to the techniques of modern epidemiology, the course emphasizes the historical evolution of ideas of causation, treatment, and prevention of disease. The course is a required component of the concentration in Community and Global Health. Offered most semesters; check with MSCS chair for upcoming academic year. (4 Credits)

  
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    STAT 155 - Introduction to Statistical Modeling


    An introductory statistics course with an emphasis on multivariate modeling. Topics include descriptive statistics, experiment and study design, probability, hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, single and multi-way analysis of variance, logistic regression. Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    STAT 194 - Topics Course


    Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing. (4 Credits)

  
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    STAT 253 - Statistical Machine Learning


    The linear and logistic modeling techniques from STAT 155  are augmented with the three foundational machine learning tasks: regression, classification, and clustering.  The course explores techniques central to these tasks, including methods of data exploration, supervised and unsupervised learning, parametric and nonparametric modeling, and model training and evaluation.  As required by the application of these sophisticated techniques, the course also introduces foundational statistical computer programming concepts.    Prerequisite(s): STAT 155 . Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    STAT 294 - Topics Course


    Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing. (4 Credits)

  
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    STAT 354 - Probability

    Cross-Listed as MATH 354  
    An introduction to probability theory and application. Fundamental probability concepts include: sample spaces, combinatorics, conditional probability, independence, random variables, probability distributions, expectation, variance, moment-generating functions, and limit theorems. Special course topics vary and may include: computer simulation, stochastic processes, and statistical inference. Prerequisite(s): MATH 237 ; or MATH 137  and MATH 236 . Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    STAT 394 - Topics Course


      Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing. (4 Credits)

  
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    STAT 451 - Causal Inference


    “Correlation does not imply causation.” We’ve all heard this mantra, warding us away from reading too much into the association between murder rates and ice cream sales, between shoe size and reading ability, and the like. But this mantra leaves us wanting: how do we study causation? Questions of causation are essential when we try to understand the effects of new medical treatments, policies, or programs. In this course, we’ll examine frameworks of thinking, statistical tools, and study designs that enable us to learn about the causal effects of interventions. Some specific topics include graphical causal models, randomized experiments, propensity score methods, instrumental variables, and interrupted time series designs. This course should be useful to those interested in biology, economics, medicine, public policy and any area in which interventions are routinely evaluated.  Prerequisite(s): STAT 155  and STAT 354   Offered occasionally. (4 Credits)

  
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    STAT 452 - Correlated Data


    One of the most common assumptions made in Statistics is that observations are independent; however, there are many situations in which the data violate this assumption by design. In this class, we discuss advanced visualization and modeling approaches for when the data are correlated. Topics will include time series analysis, longitudinal data analysis, and spatial data analysis. Applications are drawn from across the disciplines. Prerequisite(s): STAT 155  and STAT 354   On a rotating basis. (4 Credits)

  
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    STAT 453 - Survival Analysis


    Survival analysis refers to a set of methods used for modeling “time-­to-­event” or “duration” data. In many studies, the outcome of interest is the time between between events (e.g. onset of Alzheimer’s until death, time unlit default on a loan, unemployment duration, marriage duration, removal-­to-­recurrence of a tumor, emergency room length of stay). Survival analysis evolved from a practical reality: the precise values of data are often unknown. We will introduce the concepts of censoring and truncation, and discuss the Kaplan-­Meier curve, parametric regression models, Cox’s proportional hazards model, and time-­varying covariates. The course will have an applied focus. Examples may be drawn from a variety of fields including, but not restricted to, medicine, economics, sociology, and political science. The course will count toward completion of the concentration in Community and Global Health. Prerequisite(s): STAT 155  and MATH 354 . On a rotating basis. (4 Credits)

  
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    STAT 454 - Bayesian Statistics


    Bayesian statistics, an alternative to the traditional frequentist approach taken in our other statistics courses, is playing an increasingly integral role in modern statistics.  Highlighted by Nate Silver of fivethirtyeight.com and Baseball Prospectus fame, Bayesian statistics has even reached a popular audience.  This course explores the Bayesian philosophy, the Bayesian approach to statistical analysis, Bayesian computing, as well as both sides of the frequentist versus Bayesian debate.  Topics include Bayes’ Theorem, prior and posterior probability distributions, Bayesian regression, Bayesian hierarchical models, and an introduction to Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques. Prerequisite(s): STAT 155  and MATH 354 . On a rotating basis. (4 Credits)

  
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    STAT 455 - Mathematical Statistics

    Cross-Listed as MATH 455  
    An important course for students considering graduate work in statistics or biostatistics, this course explores the mathematics underlying modern statistical applications. Topics include: classical techniques for parameter estimation and evaluation of estimator properties, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, and linear regression. Special topics vary and may include: tests of independence, resampling techniques, introductory Bayesian concepts, and non­parametric methods. Though not the focus of this course, concepts will be highlighted through applications in a variety of settings. Prerequisite(s): MATH 354  . Every Spring (4 Credits)

  
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    STAT 456 - Advanced Data Science in R


    This capstone course will expand on R skills you learned in STAT 112  and STAT 253  and will also emphasize presenting results and conclusions clearly. Topics will include advanced data wrangling techniques; machine learning methods like gradient boosting, deep learning, and stacked models; machine learning tools such as tidymodels and h20; interpretable machine learning methods; interactive web apps with shiny; and websites with blogdown. Guest speakers who work in the industry will be a regular occurence. Students will play an active role in the class by creating and presenting some of the course content. Prerequisite(s): STAT 112  and STAT 253   Occasionally. (4 Credits)

  
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    STAT 494 - Topics Course


    Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing. On a rotating basis. (4 Credits)

  
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    STAT 601 - Tutorial


    Closely supervised individual (or very small group) study with a faculty member in which a student may explore, by way of readings, short writings, etc., an area of mathematics not available through the regular offerings. Prerequisite(s):   Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (1 Credits)

  
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    STAT 602 - Tutorial


    Closely supervised individual (or very small group) study with a faculty member in which a student may explore, by way of readings, short writings, etc., an area of mathematics not available through the regular offerings. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (2 Credits)

  
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    STAT 603 - Tutorial


    Closely supervised individual (or very small group) study with a faculty member in which a student may explore, by way of readings, short writings, etc., an area of mathematics not available through the regular offerings. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (3 Credits)

  
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    STAT 604 - Tutorial


    Closely supervised individual (or very small group) study with a faculty member in which a student may explore, by way of readings, short writings, etc., an area of mathematics not available through the regular offerings. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    STAT 611 - Independent Project


    Individual project including library research, conferences with instructor, oral and written reports on independent work in mathematics. Subject matter may complement but not duplicate material covered in regular courses. Prerequisite(s): Arrangement with faculty prior to registration, departmental approval, and permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (1 Credits)

  
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    STAT 612 - Independent Project


    Individual project including library research, conferences with instructor, oral and written reports on independent work in mathematics. Subject matter may complement but not duplicate material covered in regular courses. Prerequisite(s): Arrangement with faculty prior to registration, departmental approval, and permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (2 Credits)

  
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    STAT 613 - Independent Project


    Individual project including library research, conferences with instructor, oral and written reports on independent work in mathematics. Subject matter may complement but not duplicate material covered in regular courses. Prerequisite(s): Arrangement with faculty prior to registration, departmental approval, and permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (3 Credits)

  
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    STAT 614 - Independent Project


    Individual project including library research, conferences with instructor, oral and written reports on independent work in mathematics. Subject matter may complement but not duplicate material covered in regular courses. Prerequisite(s): Arrangement with faculty prior to registration, departmental approval, and permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
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    STAT 621 - Internship


    Internships are offered only as S/SD/N grading option. Prerequisite(s): Junior and Senior standing. Arrangements must be made prior to registration. Departmental approval and permission of instructor required. Work with Internship Office. Every semester. (1 Credits)

 

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