Jul 13, 2024  
College Catalog 2021-2022 
    
College Catalog 2021-2022 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 

Mathematics

  
  • STAT 622 - Internship


    Internships are offered only as S/SD/N grading option. Prerequisite(s): Junior and Senior standing. Arrangements must be made prior to registration. Departmental approval and permission of instructor required. Work with Internship Office. Every semester. (2 Credits)

  
  • STAT 623 - Internship


    Internships are offered only as S/SD/N grading option. Prerequisite(s): Junior and Senior standing. Arrangements must be made prior to registration. Departmental approval and permission of instructor required. Work with Internship Office. Every semester. (3 Credits)

  
  • STAT 624 - Internship


    Internships are offered only as S/SD/N grading option. Prerequisite(s): Junior and Senior standing. Arrangements must be made prior to registration. Departmental approval and permission of instructor required. Work with Internship Office. Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
  • STAT 631 - Preceptorship


    Work in assisting faculty in the planning and teaching of a course. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor. Work with Academic Programs Office to complete a Preceptor Learning Contract Form. Every semester. (1 Credits)

  
  • STAT 632 - Preceptorship


    Work in assisting faculty in the planning and teaching of a course. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor. Work with Academic Programs Office to complete a Preceptor Learning Contract Form. Every semester. (2 Credits)

  
  • STAT 633 - Preceptorship


    Work in assisting faculty in the planning and teaching of a course. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor. Work with Academic Programs Office to complete a Preceptor Learning Contract Form. Every semester. (3 Credits)

  
  • STAT 634 - Preceptorship


    Work in assisting faculty in the planning and teaching of a course. Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor. Work with Academic Programs Office to complete a Preceptor Learning Contract Form. Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
  • STAT 641 - Honors Independent


    Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (1 Credits)

  
  • STAT 642 - Honors Independent


    Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (2 Credits)

  
  • STAT 643 - Honors Independent


    Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (3 Credits)

  
  • STAT 644 - Honors Independent


    Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (4 Credits)


Media and Cultural Studies

  
  • MCST 110 - Texts and Power: Foundations of Media and Cultural Studies


    This course introduces students to the intellectual roots and contemporary applications of cultural studies, including critical media studies, focusing on the theoretical bases for analyses of power and meaning in production, texts, and reception. It includes primary readings in anti-racist, feminist, modern, postmodern, and queer cultural and social theory, and compares them to traditional approaches to the humanities. Designed as preparation for intermediate and advanced work grounded in cultural studies, the course is writing intensive, with special emphasis on developing skills in critical thinking and scholarly argumentation and documentation. Completion of or enrollment in MCST 110 is the prerequisite for majoring in media and cultural studies. Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 114 - News Reporting and Writing


    This class gives an introduction to the many media platforms that are vital to contemporary journalism, and provides a strong foundation in news writing and reporting. It is taught by a veteran editor and writer, who is a Macalester graduate and currently a digital editor at the Minneapolis Star Tribune ( startribune.com ). Campus and Twin Cities communities are used as students plan, develop, report and write stories individually and in groups. Cookies are usually served in class.   (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 126 - Local News Media Institutions


    In this course students analyze the social, cultural, economic, political, and regulatory factors shaping the nature of US communications media, and then investigate how this affects local media organizations and their role in recognizing, serving and facilitating (or not) local populations, communities, interaction, identity, and civic engagement. Considering the history and practices of American journalism, and the current shifts in media technology and economics, the class examines the degree to which media function to provide effective access to news and information, foster diversity of content, encourage civic engagement, and serve the interest of citizens and diverse communities in a democratic society. Individual student projects for the course begin by identifying particular geographic, ethnic, or cultural neighborhoods and communities in the Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan area, and proceed to explore the degree to which these communities are recognized, defined, or served by various media institutions and journalism practice. Students explore various attempts to revitalize local communication, news delivery and civic discourse through experiments in community media, citizen journalism, community-based news aggregation, media arts, community service and other media innovations and reforms across neighborhood, ethnic, immigrant, gender, sexuality, and other public issues and community participation. Every year. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 128 - Film Analysis/Visual Culture


    This course introduces the aesthetics of film as well as selected issues in contemporary film studies. Its aesthetic approach isolates the features that constitute film as a distinct art form: narrative or non-narrative structure, staging, cinematography, editing, and sound. Topics in contemporary film studies that might be considered include one or more of the following: cultural studies and film, industrial organization and globalization, representations of gender and race, and theories of authorship, horror, and spectatorship. Several papers, a test covering basic film terms, and a short video project emphasizing abstract form are required. Suitable for first year students. Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 194 - Topics Course


    Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 202 - Global Media Industries

    Cross-Listed as  INTL 202 
    Global media collectively have tremendous influence in how many see and comprehend the world and therefore on the information and beliefs upon which they feel or act. While media are central to the continued production of a sense of “the world” at large or the “global” scale, media industries are situated geographically, culturally and institutionally. Even if they promise worldwide coverage or are multinational companies, there is much to be gained from studying how media are produced and distributed differently according to specific social, political, economic and historical conditions. This course considers media industries around the world with a focus on the relationships between the labor and infrastructures behind representations in a broad range of media (television, radio, cinema, news, telecommunications, internet). (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 232 - Fundamentals of Video Production


    This course is designed as a basic introduction to digital video production. The objective of the class is to familiarize students of film theory and history with the language of cinema from the standpoint of production in order to deepen your appreciation and knowledge of the technical aspects of film/video and to develop your capacity to use video as a tool for research and communication. In this way, the course will be a combination of technical instruction, critical engagement, and creative exploration. We will analyze and employ a variety of filmmaking techniques as well as constructing narrative and non-narrative strategies for doing so. The focus of the course will be to familiarize you with some basic conventions of experimental, documentary, and narrative cinema. In each assignment, you will be encouraged to think about how formal decisions enhance and further narrative or thematic elements. We will thus pay very close attention to formal aspects of cinematic production: mise-en-scene. cinematography, editing, and sound design. In addition to this attention to form, success in the class will be dependent on a commitment to working through the technical aspects of video production (camera operation, lighting, editing software) in order to create short, original video pieces. Every year. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 234 - New Media Theories/Practices


    In the last couple of decades we have seen the invention and popularization of a wide assortment of digital technologies and with them, a wide variety of new media forms. The internet (which includes a collection of media forms, from web pages and peer-to-peer software to social media and video sharing sites), massively multiplayer online video games, ubiquitous computing, software, mobile phones - together, many argue, these and other forms of new media are reshaping how we live, create, work and even, what it means to be human. In this class we’ll examine a cross-section of contemporary humanistic research that has sought to understand the impact(s) of new media through a comparison to earlier, pre-digital media. In addition, we will engage in hands-on workshops, where we will use and learn some of the tools, software, and websites that our texts consider. Every year. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 247 - Documentary Film and Video


    This course explores the history and theory of documentary practices in film and video: the epistemological issues and critical debates surrounding documentary attempts to depict and/or comment on -reality,- the implications of cinematic technique and style for documentary representation and function, and the place of documentary representation in social, political and cultural discourses about nation, race, gender, sexuality, and class. The course integrates critical readings on documentary history and theory and viewings and discussions of relevant documentary films and videos. Prerequisite(s): MCST 128  recommended. Every year. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 248 - History of Film 1893-1941


    This course provides an overview of the history of film up through the release of Citizen Kane , examining aesthetic, industrial, social, and theoretical topics in a variety of national and cultural contexts. Discussions, lectures, and screenings emphasize commercial and avant-garde styles and their determinants. What is the style now referred to as the “classical Hollywood cinema?- Why did it materialize? What alternatives were there? The course explores issues of racism and gender as well as connections between the history of film and the modernization of European and U.S. culture. Several papers are required. Prerequisite(s): MCST 128  recommended, sophomore status or permission of instructor. Alternate years. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 249 - History of Film Since 1941


    This course provides an overview of the history of film from the early 1940s, examining aesthetic, industrial, social, and theoretical topics in a variety of national and cultural contexts. Discussions, lectures, and screenings emphasize international commercial and alternative styles and their determinants. Why and how did alternative styles develop against and within the Hollywood system? The course explores issues of racism and gender as well as connections between the history of film and postwar transformations, with particular attention to the effects on filmmaking of the Cold War in the United States and of post colonial struggles in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Several papers are required. Students who have completed MCST 248 - History of Film 1893-1941 will be encouraged to engage in independent research. Prerequisite(s): MCST 128  recommended. Alternate years. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 252 - Photography: Theories and Practices of an International Medium

    Cross-Listed as ANTH 252  and INTL 252  
    This course examines histories, theories and practices of photography, a medium that has transformed significantly since the daguerrotypes of the mid 19th century.  In 1839, Daguerre’s invention was presented as “a free gift to the world.”  This course will look at how that gift has been put to use in photographic cultures around the world in contexts as diverse as portrait studios in Yogyakarta, a history museum in Vietnam, French advertising, Soviet family albums and news imagery circulating worldwide. While we will pay careful attention to visual aesthetics, we will focus on photography as a documentary genre that has long been central to how individuals imagine the world beyond their experience. We will also be considering personal photographic archives such as family albums and scrapbooks and asking when private photographs become public representations.  One central feature of the course will be learning about how scholars have thought about and through photography and discussing the complications of applying these theories transhistorically and cross-culturally.  (Berger, Barthes, Benjamin, Sontag, Sekula, Strassler, Pinney, Tagg, Azoulay) Topics for discussion include debates around truth in photography and the politics of representation, photography’s relationship to history and changing institutional uses of photography, as well as different photographic cultures and their anthropological and sociological significance. Every year. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 256 - Mass Culture Under Communism

    Cross-Listed as  RUSS 256 
    Revolution to the fall of communism. For each period in Soviet history, changes in the production and consumption of culture will be considered with specific examples to be discussed. Topics dealt with in the course include the role of mass media in society, popular participation in “totalitarian” societies, culture as a political tool. Popular films, newspapers and magazines, songs, radio and TV programs, etc., will serve to analyze the policies that inspired them and the popular reactions (both loyal and dissenting) they evoked. Taught in English. Alternate years. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 266 - Cinema Studies

    Cross-Listed as GERM 366  


    ​Taught in English, with an optional German component for those who want to have the course count toward their German-taught courses. In this case, students must do the reading and writing assignments in German and participate in extra discussion sessions in German (format and frequency to be determined with the instructor).

    Cinema Studies is a film course with a special emphasis on some aspect of German culture relating to cinema, such as German film production, film adaptations of German literary texts, or the representation of German history in world cinema. While familiarizing students with the methodologies of film analysis, the course focus may vary from a historical or genre survey to a particular concept (such as representations of gender, race, nationality) to a cross-section between film and other texts. Students will gain insight into film as an aesthetic, ideological, and political medium, and into specifics of German history and culture. Students may register more than once in this course, provided a different topic is offered.​ Prerequisite(s): For the optional German component: GERM 308  or GERM 309 , or study abroad, or permission of instructor.   Alternate spring semesters. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 279 - Value: The Bad, the Ugly, and the Cheap

    Cross-Listed as GERM 279  
    For thousands of years value has been scrutinized in philosophy, art history, and economic analysis, as it cuts across three constitutive aspects of social, cultural, and political life: economy, aesthetics, and ethics. Not only do we have and impose on the world our moral, aesthetic, and exchange values, but these three fields often become difficult to distinguish, as is evident in the slippery flexibility of words that allow us to say as much “this painting is bad or worthless” as “I think this person is bad or worthless,” or “this is a bad, or worthless, remark” and “this is a bad or worthless check.” This course will focus primarily on influential accounts of value in aesthetic theory, while also examining the ways in which aesthetic value demarcates itself from or implicates its moral and economic counterparts, and what the interplays among the three fields entail for aesthetic value. Our readings will focus on the impact of primarily German thought on the formation of modern aesthetic theory-from the early eighteenth century through the Enlightenment and Romanticism to high modernism and the Frankfurt School. Class and readings in English. Prerequisite(s): No pre-knowledge required. This course is appropriate for all level students. Occasionally. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 281 - Bruce Lee, His Life and Legacy

    Cross-Listed as AMST 281  and ASIA 283  
    This discussion-based course is entirely focused on Bruce Lee, the actor and leading martial arts icon of the 20th century. Using American Studies and Critical Race Studies frames to examine the construction of racialized and gendered bodies, we will discuss Bruce Lee in terms of his biography, identities, politics, philosophy, and filmography. We will take time to appreciate the entertainment value and athleticism that Bruce Lee brought to his work, but we will also learn to distinguish the commercialized, commodified Bruce Lee (from t-shirts to posters to action figures) from the serious historical figure who symbolized the spirit of cultural independence and political sovereignty around the world. Among the required books and movies: The Tao of Jeet Kune Do, and “Way of the Dragon” (1972). Every year. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 294 - Topics Course


    Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 315 - Gender, Sexuality and Film

    Cross-Listed as WGSS 320 
    This course explores a variety of critical approaches to the representation of gender and sexuality in film and video, including psychoanalytic feminist film theory and criticism, queer theory, narrative analysis, genre, visual culture, and cultural studies of gender and sexuality in relation to race, nation, and class. How have social constructs about gender and sexuality been promulgated and/or contested in film and video within mainstream and avant-garde contexts of cultural production? How have these constructs functioned to uphold and/or challenge other forms of social stratification or privilege? And, how might the woman’s body in particular-both as a sight to behold and a site of looking-offer different ways of thinking representational possibility? In asking these questions, the course considers a wide range of issues, including the gaze, the body, media technologies, spectatorship, identity and identification, realism, mythology, and pornography. Written work emphasizes the close analysis of film texts.  Prerequisite(s): Prerequisites: sophomore standing;   , Film Analysis and Visual Culture, or a course in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; or permission of the instructor. Alternate years. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 321 - Cultures of Neoliberalism

    Cross-Listed as INTL 321  
    Neoliberal theory posits the relative autonomy of the economic sphere from both culture and politics. Rejecting this assumption, the course will give students the ability to understand the interconnection of economic, political and cultural practices as well as the ways that economic theories are shaped by cultural assumptions about what constitutes a person, a life, a society, etc. We will read some of the foundational texts from the neoliberal school of economic thought (Friedrich Hayek, Milton Friedman) alongside more contemporary reflections on the culture and politics of neoliberalism from the fields of Anthropology, Geography, Philosophy, Cultural Studies, and Critical Race Studies. Additionally, we will look at both the global institutions that craft and enforce economic policies as well as their impacts in multiple international contexts. This course will emphasize interdisciplinarity and original research. Finally, in addition to key texts, we will examine recent documentaries that attempt to render economic structures visible. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 331 - Racial Formation, Culture and U.S. History


    This interdisciplinary course will employ the methodologies of cultural and media studies within an historical framework to ask: What roles did “race” (the presence of diverse races; the relationships among those groups of people; the construction and representation of racial identities; the linking of material privileges and power to racial locations) play in the development of the United States? How have relationships of class, gender, ethnicity, and sexuality been linked to “race”? How has “race” been a site of struggle between groups? How is the present a product of historical experiences? Our coursework will rely on reading historical studies, theory, cultural analysis, and memoirs, and on viewing and analyzing cultural performances and films. This course is designed for students with experience in history, cultural studies, African American studies and/or American studies. Alternate years. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 334 - Cultural Studies and the Media

    Cross-Listed as AMST 334 
    An overview of contemporary approaches to media as culture, a determining as well as determined sphere in which people make sense of the world, particularly in terms of ethnicity, gender, identity, and social inequality. Students develop tools for analyzing media texts and accounts of audience responses derived from the international field of cultural studies and from the social theory on which it draws. Analysis emphasizes specificity of media texts, including advertisements, films, news reports, and television shows. Experience in cooperative discussion, research, and publication.   Prerequisite(s):  MCST 110  or permission of instructor Every year. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 337 - Dead White Men

    Cross-Listed as GERM 337 
    Today we often hear people dismiss the Western (mostly European) philosophical tradition as a bunch of “dead white men.” In other words, the argument goes, these thinkers harbored such passe notions as universal truths, a universal subject, and an individual in total control of itself and endowed with a pure reason unadulterated by rhetoric, imagination, fiction, and politics. Why should we bother with “dead white men” now that we understand that truth depends on historical context, that the self is decentered by the unconscious, that identity is constituted by gender, race, class, and other cultural factors, that truth is linked to power, and that ideology is omnipresent? Unfortunately, this all-too-familiar attitude overlooks its own faulty presupposition: it presumes a clear-cut break between philosophical tradition and contemporary thought, as if contemporary thought had no tradition out of which it emerged and could, therefore, merely discard what preceded it. Hence the popularity of phrases like “philosophy is dead.” It is all the more ironic to see this attitude prevail in the West at the very moment that multiculturalism has become our cause celebre : all cultural traditions are supposed to be “respected,” except the West’s own tradition. (Perhaps as a new way for the West to reinstate surreptitiously its superiority as the sole culture with no tradition?) This course pursues a close reading of texts by various “dead white men” as the unconscious (i.e., repressed and, for that matter, all the more powerful) undercurrent of contemporary thought. Assigned texts will include: Parmenides, Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Pascal, Spinoza, Kant, Hegel, Marx, as well as texts by twentieth-century thinkers that stress the dependence of contemporary thought on philosophy. No pre-knowledge required; all readings in English. With different reading lists this course may be taken more than once for credit. Alternate years. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 342 - Representing the World As It Is: Histories and Theories of Ethnographic Film

    Cross-Listed as ANTH 342  and INTL 342  
    How can an experience of the world as it is be represented?  What are the promises and challenges of transcultural filmmaking?  This course will explore what has been called ethnographic, cross-cultural and transcultural cinema from several points of view.  We will look at ethnographic film in terms of its geo-political, anthropological and cinematic origins, and then delve into its various forms and contemporary manifestations.  We will examine some of the major films of the canon of ethnographic cinema, and look at the developments of several of its most renowned practitioners (Flaherty, Mead, Rouch, Marshall, Gardner, Asch, MacDougall).  We will explore the shifting forms and representational strategies of ethnographic film and how these are linked to technological and ideological transformations.  We will see how scholars inside and outside of anthropology have defined, criticized or challenged the project of ethnographic film, and how recent film and video makers, including those who traditionally have been the subject of the ethnographic gaze, have created new ways of visualizing experience for themselves and for others. Every year. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 354 - Blackness in the Media

    Cross-Listed as AMST 354 
    This course examines mainstream and alternative systems of African American representation in the media from the 1820s to the 1960s, including race records, race movies, the Black press, Black video, and Black appeal radio. It also examines the way Blackness is constructed in the media today, including the role of new media (such as cable and the Internet); new corporate formations (such as FOX, UPN, and BET), and new forms of representation (such as representations that reject the Black-White binary). Prerequisite(s): AMST 110  or MCST 110  or permission of instructor. Every year. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 355 - Advanced Journalism: Electronic


    Writing and production of news, feature, and documentary stories for radio, television, and news media. The course stresses effective script writing and the development of a strong sense of journalistic ethics in an electronic environment. Emphasis is placed on frequent visits with practicing journalists and policy makers, on-site visits to electronic newsrooms, and field news assignments on campus and throughout the Twin Cities. Students will produce video, audio, and Internet stories. The course also examines the changing role of the media and the impact of electronic media and broadcast journalists on politics, government, education, and the legal system. Taught by a 20-year veteran print and broadcast journalist and former U.S. Senate press secretary. Prerequisite(s): MCST 114 - News Reporting and Writing  or permission of instructor. Alternate years. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 357 - Advanced Journalism: New Media


    In-depth reporting and writing of news, feature and opinion pieces. This course stresses effective writing and editing and the development of a strong sense of journalistic ethics. Emphasis is placed on reporting throughout the community and frequent discussions with practicing journalists, writers and policy makers. Students will examine the changing role and formats of media and the impact of media and journalists on culture, politics, government, education, the legal system and the community. Taught by a veteran print and online journalist and editor. Prerequisite(s): MCST 114 - News Reporting and Writing  or permission of instructor. Alternate years. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 364 - Afrofuturism in Media and Popular Culture


    This course examines the Afrofuturist school of cultural representation, which includes science fiction, speculative fiction, fantasy and magic realism, in film, television, and new media. It includes literary narratives and works of music and other arts that construct, re-construct and/or critique the history, present and future of African American and other African diasporic people. Prerequisite(s): MCST 110 , AMST 101 , AMST 103 , or AMST 110  . Every other year. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 376 - Critical Social Theory and the Media


    Studies of the contributions critical social theory has made to research oriented toward democratic communication. Class discussion evaluates the social uses of theories and probes assumptions and values embedded within them. A research paper allows each student to examine one theory or theoretical issue in detail. Prerequisite(s):  MCST 110  or permission of instructor. Alternate years. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 394 - Topics Course


    Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 488 - Advanced Topics Seminar


    In the capstone seminar, students working on an independent project in line with the theme of the seminar share their scholarship, integrating what they have learned in the major, emphasizing knowledge gained in their focus area, as well as presenting their work at a concluding mini-conference. The capstone experience involves close analysis of cultural artifacts that examine at a higher level issues first raised in the introductory course. The department plans to offer two seminars every year, at least one in media studies, enabling students to select the seminar most relevant to their intellectual development. In exceptional cases, students with sufficient preparation may take the seminar prior to their senior year. Students may take more than one MCST senior seminar as long as content varies. Recent seminar topics have included: Image/Text: Metaphor, Myth and Power; Advanced Film Analysis; Advanced Studies in War and Media; Postmodernism, Identity and the Media; Whiteness and the Media; Advanced Queer Media. Prerequisite(s):   or permission of instructor.   recommended for film studies seminars. Non-majors are welcome if they have taken   or a comparable course. Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 494 - Topics Course


    Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 601 - Tutorial


    Closely supervised individual or small group study for advanced students on a subject not available through regular catalog offerings. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (1 Credits)

  
  • MCST 602 - Tutorial


    Closely supervised individual or small group study for advanced students on a subject not available through regular catalog offerings. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (2 Credits)

  
  • MCST 603 - Tutorial


    Closely supervised individual or small group study for advanced students on a subject not available through regular catalog offerings. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (3 Credits)

  
  • MCST 604 - Tutorial


    Closely supervised individual or small group study for advanced students on a subject not available through regular catalog offerings. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 611 - Independent Project


    For the advanced student capable of independent study and the production of original work. Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor. Every semester. (1 Credits)

  
  • MCST 612 - Independent Project


    For the advanced student capable of independent study and the production of original work. Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor. Every semester. (2 Credits)

  
  • MCST 613 - Independent Project


    For the advanced student capable of independent study and the production of original work. Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor. Every semester. (3 Credits)

  
  • MCST 614 - Independent Project


    For the advanced student capable of independent study and the production of original work. Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 621 - Internship


    The department offers a variety of internships in educational, business, and governmental institutions. Internships sponsored by department faculty are available only to juniors and seniors who have made substantial progress toward the major or have completed a media studies minor or the equivalent and must be grounded in previous coursework. Normally, internships are graded pass/fail. Exceptions to this policy permitting a letter grade may be made at the discretion of the individual faculty member sponsoring the internship. Internships may be of variable credit as determined by the instructor, and up to four credits may be applied to the department major. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor; work with Internship Office. Every semester. (1 Credits)

  
  • MCST 622 - Internship


    The department offers a variety of internships in educational, business, and governmental institutions. Internships sponsored by department faculty are available only to juniors and seniors who have made substantial progress toward the major or have completed a media studies minor or the equivalent and must be grounded in previous coursework. Normally, internships are graded pass/fail. Exceptions to this policy permitting a letter grade may be made at the discretion of the individual faculty member sponsoring the internship. Internships may be of variable credit as determined by the instructor, and up to four credits may be applied to the department major. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor; work with Internship Office. Every semester. (2 Credits)

  
  • MCST 623 - Internship


    The department offers a variety of internships in educational, business, and governmental institutions. Internships sponsored by department faculty are available only to juniors and seniors who have made substantial progress toward the major or have completed a media studies minor or the equivalent and must be grounded in previous coursework. Normally, internships are graded pass/fail. Exceptions to this policy permitting a letter grade may be made at the discretion of the individual faculty member sponsoring the internship. Internships may be of variable credit as determined by the instructor, and up to four credits may be applied to the department major. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor; work with Internship Office. Every semester. (3 Credits)

  
  • MCST 624 - Internship


    The department offers a variety of internships in educational, business, and governmental institutions. Internships sponsored by department faculty are available only to juniors and seniors who have made substantial progress toward the major or have completed a media studies minor or the equivalent and must be grounded in previous coursework. Normally, internships are graded pass/fail. Exceptions to this policy permitting a letter grade may be made at the discretion of the individual faculty member sponsoring the internship. Internships may be of variable credit as determined by the instructor, and up to four credits may be applied to the department major. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. Work with Internship Office. Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 631 - Preceptorship


    Work in assisting a faculty member on a varied range of activities involved in the planning and teaching of a course. Duties usually include course attendance, library research, test correction, conducting group study sessions, and tutoring individual students. Normally available only to juniors and seniors who have taken the course they will precept. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor; work with Academic Programs. Every semester. (1 Credits)

  
  • MCST 632 - Preceptorship


    Work in assisting a faculty member on a varied range of activities involved in the planning and teaching of a course. Duties usually include course attendance, library research, test correction, conducting group study sessions, and tutoring individual students. Normally available only to juniors and seniors who have taken the course they will precept. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor; work with Academic Programs. Every semester. (2 Credits)

  
  • MCST 633 - Preceptorship


    Work in assisting a faculty member on a varied range of activities involved in the planning and teaching of a course. Duties usually include course attendance, library research, test correction, conducting group study sessions, and tutoring individual students. Normally available only to juniors and seniors who have taken the course they will precept. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor; work with Academic Programs. Every semester. (3 Credits)

  
  • MCST 634 - Preceptorship


    Work in assisting a faculty member on a varied range of activities involved in the planning and teaching of a course. Duties usually include course attendance, library research, test correction, conducting group study sessions, and tutoring individual students. Normally available only to juniors and seniors who have taken the course they will precept. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. Work with Academic Programs. Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
  • MCST 641 - Honors Independent


    Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (1 Credits)

  
  • MCST 642 - Honors Independent


    Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (2 Credits)

  
  • MCST 643 - Honors Independent


    Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (3 Credits)

  
  • MCST 644 - Honors Independent


    Independent research, writing, or other preparation leading to the culmination of the senior honors project. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor and department chair. Every semester. (4 Credits)


Music

  
  • MUSI 70 - Wind Symphony


    The Macalester Wind Ensemble performs music in a wide variety of styles, from as early as the 17th century to the classics of band literature, to music composed within the last few years. It is open without audition to wind and percussion students with at least high-school level performance skills. Fall semester. (1 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 71 - Wind Symphony


    The Macalester Wind Ensemble performs music in a wide variety of styles, from as early as the 17th century to the classics of band literature, to music composed within the last few years. It is open without audition to wind and percussion students with at least high-school level performance skills. Spring semester. (1 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 72 - African Music Ensemble


    Study of traditional African music through performance modes of drumming, singing, flutes, marimba, gyil, and dancing. Instrumental and vocal pieces will be selected from a variety of musical styles such as unaccompanied vocal chants, songs, music from life cycle events, royal music and music for social and other festive occasions. The repertoire includes music from Ghana, Guinea, Nigeria, Tanzania and Zimbabwe. Fall semester. (1 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 73 - African Music Ensemble


    Study of traditional African music through performance modes of drumming, singing, flutes, marimba, gyil, and dancing. Instrumental and vocal pieces will be selected from a variety of musical styles such as unaccompanied vocal chants, songs, music from life cycle events, royal music and music for social and other festive occasions. The repertoire includes music from Ghana, Guinea, Nigeria, Tanzania and Zimbabwe. Spring semester. (1 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 74 - Macalester Concert Choir


    The Concert Choir is the advanced, select vocal ensemble of Macalester College, directed by Michael McGaghie. Members are held to an exceptional standard of musicianship and commitment. The choir draws its repertoire from music of the last six centuries and tours annually through the United States or abroad. The ensemble commissions and premieres at least one new work every year. Membership is open to all Macalester students by audition. Three 90-minute rehearsals per week. Fall semester. (1 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 75 - Macalester Concert Choir


    The Concert Choir is the advanced, select vocal ensemble of Macalester College, directed by Michael McGaghie. Members are held to an exceptional standard of musicianship and commitment. The choir draws its repertoire from music of the last six centuries and tours annually through the United States or abroad. The ensemble commissions and premieres at least one new work every year. Membership is open to all Macalester students by audition. Three 90-minute rehearsals per week. Spring semester. (1 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 76 - Macalester Chorale


    The Chorale is the large choral ensemble of Macalester College, directed by Michael McGaghie. The choir’s repertoire includes a cappella and accompanied music from various Western and non-Western vocal traditions. The Chorale and Concert Choir combine annually to perform a major work with orchestra. Membership is open to all Macalester students by audition. Two 90-minute rehearsals per week. Fall semester. (1 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 77 - Macalester Chorale


    The Chorale is the large choral ensemble of Macalester College, directed by Michael McGaghie. The choir’s repertoire includes a cappella and accompanied music from various Western and non-Western vocal traditions. The Chorale and Concert Choir combine annually to perform a major work with orchestra. Membership is open to all Macalester students by audition. Two 90-minute rehearsals per week. Spring semester. (1 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 78 - Asian Music Ensemble


    The Macalester Asian Music Ensemble performs traditional and modern music from East and Central Asia. Core instruments include a variety of plucked lutes and zithers, bowed fiddles, bamboo/reed flutes, hammered dulcimer, and percussion from Chinese music and traditions across the Silk Road. (1 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 79 - Asian Music Ensemble


    The Macalester Asian Music Ensemble performs traditional and modern music from East and Central Asia. Core instruments include a variety of plucked lutes and zithers, bowed fiddles, bamboo/reed flutes, hammered dulcimer, and percussion from Chinese music and traditions across the Silk Road. (1 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 80 - Mac Jazz Band


    (1 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 81 - Mac Jazz Band


    (1 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 82 - Jazz/Popular Music Combos


    Jazz and Popular Music Combos are open to all who wish to concentrate on repertoire, improvisation and original music. Students will focus on developing their composition and performance skills while exploring many different styles of contemporary music. The combos present two concerts each year. Fall semester. (1 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 83 - Jazz/Popular Music Combos


    Jazz and Popular Music Combos are open to all who wish to concentrate on repertoire, improvisation and original music. Students will focus on developing their composition and performance skills while exploring many different styles of contemporary music. The combos present two concerts each year. Spring semester. (1 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 84 - Pipe Band


    Bagpipe and highland drum lessons are available free of charge to all students. Beginners and musicians of any experience level are encouraged to participate in lessons and/or ensemble.  We perform traditional and modern music at concert and competitions. Fall semester. (1 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 85 - Pipe Band


    Bagpipe and highland drum lessons are available free of charge to all students. Beginners and musicians of any experience level are encouraged to participate in lessons and/or ensemble.  We perform traditional and modern music at concert and competitions. Spring semester. (1 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 86 - Chamber Ensemble


    The Chamber Music program offers an opportunity for students to explore and perform repertoire for small ensembles. All instrumentalists and vocalists are eligible to participate and entrance is by audition or by arrangement with Mr. Mandarano. Students who are accepted into Chamber Music are placed in various ensembles and over the course of the semester immerse themselves in learning a challenging and varied repertoire. Rehearsal times are arranged based on schedule availability and individual practice is required. Ensembles receive periodic coaching from department faculty or professional studio instructors and there is least one performance required per semester. Examples of chamber ensemble include: string quartet, piano trio, woodwind quintet, brass sextet, piano trio, flute and clarinet choirs. Fall semester. (1 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 87 - Chamber Ensemble


    The Chamber Music program offers an opportunity for students to explore and perform repertoire for small ensembles. All instrumentalists and vocalists are eligible to participate and entrance is by audition or by arrangement with Mr. Mandarano. Students who are accepted into Chamber Music are placed in various ensembles and over the course of the semester immerse themselves in learning a challenging and varied repertoire. Rehearsal times are arranged based on schedule availability and individual practice is required. Ensembles receive periodic coaching from department faculty or professional studio instructors and there is least one performance required per semester. Examples of chamber ensemble include: string quartet, piano trio, woodwind quintet, brass sextet, piano trio, flute and clarinet choirs. Spring semester. (1 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 88 - Macalester Symphony Orchestra


    The Macalester Symphony Orchestra prepares and performs a wide range of repertoire for symphony orchestra from the time of Bach to the present day, including the music of living composers. Playing in the orchestra blends individual and group achievement to build toward several challenging, rewarding performances each semester. Social interaction among the members of the orchestra is facilitated by various events, including orchestra dinners and a brief tour. In the spring semester, there is a concerto competition concert, featuring student soloists. Auditions for orchestra are held at the start of the fall semester. Space permitting, a limited number of students may be able to join at the start of the spring semester. Fall semester. (1 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 89 - Macalester Symphony Orchestra


    The Macalester Symphony Orchestra prepares and performs a wide range of repertoire for symphony orchestra from the time of Bach to the present day, including the music of living composers. Playing in the orchestra blends individual and group achievement to build toward several challenging, rewarding performances each semester. Social interaction among the members of the orchestra is facilitated by various events, including orchestra dinners and a brief tour. In the spring semester, there is a concerto competition concert, featuring student soloists. Auditions for orchestra are held at the start of the fall semester. Space permitting, a limited number of students may be able to join at the start of the spring semester. Spring semester. (1 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 90 - Mac Early Music Ensemble


    Historical performance has changed the aesthetic and musical experiences of audiences all over the world. The new ways to interpret music before 1750 has changed the way the audiences listen to this kind of music. Macalester Early Music Ensemble approaches instrumental and vocal music from Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque period. No audition needed. Fall semester. (1 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 91 - Mac Early Music Ensemble


    Historical performance has changed the aesthetic and musical experiences of audiences all over the world. The new ways to interpret music before 1750 has changed the way the audiences listen to this kind of music. Macalester Early Music Ensemble approaches instrumental and vocal music from Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque period. No audition needed. Spring semester. (1 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 92 - Other Ensembles


    (1 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 93 - Other Ensembles


    (1 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 94 - Private Studio Instruction


    (1 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 95 - Private Studio Instruction


    (1 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 98 - Keyboard Skills


    Development of keyboard (piano) technique and performance/analytical skills complementary both to the music theory curriculum and the general study of music. Technical foundations and repertoire study. 1 credit awarded upon successful completion of the semester. May be repeated for credit. Every semester (1 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 99 - Piano Proficiency Exam


    (0 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 110 - Introduction to Western Classical Music


    Formerly “Music Appreciation”. This course will explore Western Art Music (a.k.a. “Classical Music”) in order to better understand how music is constructed, what music means, what social history brought it about, what instruments are used in performance and what this music has in common with other art forms. No previous musical instruction is required. Fundamentals of music will be addressed in class to establish the ability to grasp musical forms, various styles and music history. Music from J. S. Bach to the present day will be heard, compared and, to a limited degree, analyzed. Spring semester. (4 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 111 - World Music


    This course surveys traditional, folk, and pop genres from major musical traditions in Africa, Asia, the Americas, Europe, and the Middle East. We approach music as both aesthetic and social processes, and explore the relationship between music making and other domains of human experience. Students will develop basic skills in critical listening, analysis, and writing about music. Course readings and audiovisual examples are designed primarily for non-music majors or minors. Previous knowledge of musical instrument or notation is not required. (4 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 113 - Musicianship


    In this course, students will learn the basics of Western staff notation and explore melody, harmony, texture, and rhythm & meter in European classical music, as well as some other tonal genres, including pop, rock, and folk. Students will apply knowledge in written and online exercises, analysis activities, and music composition. In addition, students will learn how to convert sound into notation and notation into sound through ear training activities, including aural exercises, dictation, and sight singing. Students must take MUSI 98 - Keyboard Skills  (30-minute weekly lessons) concurrently. The department will register you and place you in the appropriate level for Keyboard Skills during the first week of class. Every semester. (4 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 131 - African Music


    Study of music in various African traditions within a social and historical context. Interrelationships between music and society (function, context, structure, gender roles, political considerations). Instruments, life-cycle rites, genres, musical organizations, traditional musicians, contemporary popular music. Fall semester. (4 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 153 - Electronic Music


    Electronic music composition explores the art of creating experimental sound compositions using analog and digital technology. Although we will survey the historical development of electronic music, the emphasis of the class is on composition, including multi-media and experimental work. The class format includes listening, discussion, lab sessions and a final concert showcasing works created throughout the semester.  (4 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 154 - Songwriting


    In this course, students will (1) learn and improve songwriting skills, with equal emphasis on lyrics and musical content, (2) embrace vulnerability and risk taking in their creative practice, (3) develop a consistent, daily practice of creative engagement, (4) engage with the local music community in the Twin Cities, and (5) become more familiar with music business practices related to songwriting. This course is run as a practical, hands-on workshop where all participants take turns sharing and critiquing each other’s creative work, in a welcoming and encouraging environment. Experience needed to succeed in the class includes the ability to sing and play an accompanying instrument, such as guitar, ukulele, or piano. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. Every other year. (4 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 155 - Music and Freedom


    The concept of freedom both lies at the heart of human rights discourse and provides the spark that ignites any number of musical movements. Intended for students with strong interests in the intersection between the performing arts and humanities, this course serves as an introduction both to the concept of freedom as it developed in Western societies since the late eighteenth century and to the history of music in the cultures that have fostered such ideals. It intends to introduce students to the study of music (and, by association, arts in general) from social, cultural, and critical perspectives, using the framework of freedom as a common theme. It also aims to contextualize the discourse of human rights within the history of arts and ideas, providing students with a a sense of the term’s changing meanings and emphases over time and across space. We will explore traditions in both Western art music (also known as “classical music”) and the American popular (recorded) music in a search for ways in which music has served social-political ideologies - overtly through the aims of its composers and performers, and unintentionally through the conditions of its reception. Historical readings on the concept of freedom from a variety of disciplinary perspectives (history, philosophy, political science, critical theory) will introduce students to several of the most influential thinkers on the subject and the central concerns and questions that animate the discourse on freedom. No prior background in music is required for the course, although it is assumed that students will have a true interest not only in popular music of the twentieth century but also other traditions and genres, such as opera and symphonic music. “Freedom” signifies a number of ideals, which operate in real-political and abstract-aesthetic realms. Music can represent, convey, and “mean” freedom in infinite ways, and it is the intention of this course to introduce students to this diversity. (4 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 180 - Music, Race, and Ethnicity


    This course examines issues of race and ethnicity in the history and performance of music across world cultures. Students develop an awareness of how racial and ethnic processes are ingrained in the production and consumption of musical sound. Assignments include critical listening, reading, class discussion, and writing projects. Previous knowledge of musical instrument or notation is not assumed. Alternate years. (4 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 194 - Topics Course


    Varies by semester. Consult the department or class schedule for current listing. (4 Credits)

  
  • MUSI 205 - Chinese and Sinophone Music

    Cross-Listed as ASIA 205  
    This course explores the multitude of music as practiced and listened to among Chinese-identifying communities by closely studying selected genres, musicians, and styles in various temporal and geographical localities. Course contents cover the musical procedures and performance practices of such genres as operas, chamber instrumental music, folk singing, pop and jazz, film and theatrical music, modern concert repertoire, as well as ancient court and ritual music. Prerequisite(s): No prior knowledge of musical instrument, notation, or Chinese languages is assumed Alternate years. (4 Credits)

 

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